Pennsylvania Railroad:
A Selected Annotated Bibliography
of Monographic Publications

CNH Bibliographies 3

Books

This page was created 13 May 2005 and last updated 7 August 2012.


 

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  1. Abendschein, Frederic H and Cupper, Dan. (1984). Career of a Champion, The Story of the First GG-1.. Quarryville, PA: Lancaster Chapter, National Railway Historical Society (56 pages, book)
    (Not yet annotated.)
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  2. Albrecht, Harry P. (1973). World famous Horseshoe Curve: Altoona, Pennsylvania Railroad. Clifton Heights, PA: Author.
    Albrecht presents a brief history of the curve covering why it was needed and how it came to be, along with black-and-white captioned photographs showing its development and importance.  He also provides a brief history of the city of Altoona and includes maps and diagrams showing track and labeled building locations of the Altoona Yards, the Altoona Machine Shops, the Altoona Car Shops, the East Altoona Engine House, and the Juniata Shops.   Also included are numerous photographs of these locations and a drawing of the PRR Altoona Shops in 1852.  Almost eighty photographs span from 1854 through the mid 1950s.  (65 pages, book)
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  3. Alexander, Edwin P. (1947). The Pennsylvania Railroad: a pictorial history. New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc.
    This is a classic look at the inception and early growth of the Pennsylvania Railroad with an emphasis on graphics.  Alexander's text presents a summary of the company's history including chapters on its origin, the building of its physical plant, its shops and marine operations, the development of its locomotives, and electrification.  His approximately 100 pages of text only enhance the 300+ black-and-white photographs and illustrations from the author's own collection which show locomotives, rolling stock, equipment, bridges, track, stations, broadsides, and more.  (248 pages, book)
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  4. Alexander, Edwin P. (1984, c1967).The Pennsylvania Railroad: A pictorial history. New York: Bonanza Books.
    A reprint of the 1947 edition, above.

  5. Alexander, Edwin P. (1971). On the main line: the Pennsylvania Railroad in the 19th century.. New York: Clarkson N. Potter, Inc.
    Alexander refers to this book as a sequel to The Pennsylvania Railroad: A Pictorial History.  In it, he covers in more detail many of the great system's scenes, structures, and equipment prior to 1900.  In the first 164 pages, the reader travels across the Main Line including the Philadelphia Division (Philadelphia to Harrisburg), the Middle Division (Harrisburg to Altoona), and the Pittsburgh Division (Altoona to Pittsburgh).  He than travels on several other divisions, such as the New York Division, Philadelphia & Erie Railroad, the Conemaugh Division, and ends the trip at the Horseshoe Curve.  This book probably has only about 20 pages of text, but the more than 380 black-and-white photographs and illustrations afford many fascinating hours to the traveler.  (310 pages, book)
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  6. American Society of Civil Engineers. (1910). New York tunnel extension, The Pennsylvania Railroad: Description of the work and facilities (Vol. 1). Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, LXVIII. New York: Author.
    and  American Society of Civil Engineers. (1910). New York tunnel extension, The Pennsylvania Railroad: Description of the work and facilities (Vol. 2). Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, LXIX. New York: Author.

    This two-volume set from ASCE provides detailed technical information about the PRR’s New York tunnel extension project including all the Society’s papers descriptive of the project.  Volume one covers, North River Division, East River Division, Meadows Division and Harrison Transfer Yard, Bergen Hill Tunnels, North River Tunnels, Terminal Station West, site of the Terminal Station, cross-town tunnels, and East River Tunnels.  Volume two covers, the contractors’ plan for East River Tunnels, lining of the four permanent shafts of the East River Division, The Long Island approaches to the East River Tunnels, The Sunnyside Yard, certain engineering structures of the New York terminal area, station construction, road, track, yard equipment, electric traction, and locomotives, and several other discussion papers.  A subject and author index is provided at the end of volume two.  (Volume one - 478 pages, Volume two – 400+ pages, books, examined at The Library of Congress)
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  7. Ayers, George B. (1859). New descriptive handbook of the Pennsylvania Railroad, and traveler's guide to the great west. Pittsburgh: W.S. Haven.
    This early guide to the places connected by the PRR in 1859 begins with Philadelphia and ends with Pittsburgh.  The author attempts to inform the reader where each place is located (miles to Philadelphia and miles to Pittsburgh) and provides a brief description of interesting features.  The descriptions range in length form a few lines for smaller locations to 19 pages for Philadelphia, including illustrations of notable buildings and historic sites.  The entry for Pittsburgh consists of 14 pages.  Altoona rates 1.5 pages.  The places are listed in geographic order from east to west.  Ayers also provides a brief description (three pages) of the PRR at the beginning and a few appendices at the end.  One appendix contains tables of railway distances to the western main routes, e.g., to Chicago via the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago RR, to Cleveland via the Cleveland & Pittsburgh RR, and others.  A description of the Harrisburg and Lancaster RR branch with place descriptions is provided in another appendix.  Another presents "Hints to Travelers" which outlines passengers' rights and privileges.  Also included are brief description of prominent cities of the west including Cincinnati, Chicago, St. Louis, and Detroit.  Period advertisements are also included.  (116 pages, book, examined at the Library of Congress)
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  8. Baer, Christopher T. and Dziobko, John. (2006). The Pennsy in the 1950s: the last great decade. Altoona, PA: Pennsylvania Railroad Technical and Historical Society.
    (Not yet annotated. Click here for information about the book from WorldCat.)
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  9. Ball, Don, Jr. (1986). The Pennsylvania Railroad, 1940s - 1950s (2nd ed.). Chester, VT: Elm Tree Books, Inc. 
    Ball offers a beautiful look at the Pennsylvania Railroad during the forties and fifties.  He primarily presents a trackside look at the motive power and rolling stock of the PRR in action through nearly 300 superb color photographs.  In addition he conveys the flavor of the railroad through a very interesting narrative containing historic facts, anecdotes, personal recollections, and interviews with PRR employees.  This book is a must-have view of the Pennsylvania Railroad. (204 pages, book)
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  10. Ballon, Hilary. (2002). New York's Pennsylvania Stations.. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. 
    (223 pages, book, Not yet annotated)
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  11. Barriger, John W., III. (1930). The Pennsylvania Railroad. New York: Calvin Bullock. 
    Barriger presents a description of the Pennsylvania Railroad concentrating on the period after it was returned to private management (1920) following the very difficult war years.  Many statistical data are included covering the years 1922 through 1929.  Data are shown for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company (the parent organization which controlled through stock ownership the other ten operating companies making up the System), the Pennsylvania Railroad Regional System (consisting of the parent company, six subsidiary railroads and one water transportation line), and the total Pennsylvania Railroad System (including the regional system and additional subsidiaries).  Over fifty black-and-white photographs are included along with Barriger's informative text and statistical tables.  (88 pages, book)
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  12. Barry, Steve & Malinoski, Robert. (2001). Trackside Around New York City 1953-1968 With Robert Malinoski. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Robert Yanosey and Morning Sun Books’ Trackside series presents the amazing work of many railroad photographers who worked in many different locations from the 1940s through the mid-1970s.  Volume 23 of this series presents the color photography of Robert Malinoski who lived his early years in Mount Carmel and Shamokin, PA and moved to New York City in 1938.  Mr. Malinoski has been a published rail photographer for over 50 years, in addition to serving in the Army Air Corps (receiving the Distinguished Flying Cross) and working in various capacities including as a yard brakeman, yard conductor, and yardmaster for the Erie Railroad, the Erie-Lackawanna, Conrail, and then New Jersey Transit.  Like the other trackside series books, this one presents many stunning photographs of railroad locomotives and equipment, and railroad settings, i.e., in this case around New York City from 1953-1968.  Of course many railroads served the area around New York City, and this book includes images of the Long Island Rail Road, the New Haven Railroad, the Central Railroad of New Jersey, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, the Reading Lines, the Lehigh Valley Railroad, the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, the Middletown & New Jersey, the Ontario & Western, the Susquehanna & Western, the New York Central, the Erie (and Eire-Lackawanna), the Lehigh & New England, and the Lehigh & Hudson River.  Of course the Pennsylvania Railroad's presence in the New York City area is covered.   by 25 photographs (all but one are on pages 60 through 71) of PRR steam, diesel, and electric locomotives.  The book includes brief biographical information about the photographer and very informative photograph captions.  Malinoski's photographs will engender many wows from all who appreciate railroad photography.  (128 pages, book, obtained from the Smithtown Library, Kings Park, NY)
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  13. Baumgardner, Mahlon J. & Hoenstone, Floyd G. (1952). The Allegheny Old Portage Railroad, 1834-1854, building, operation and travel between Hollidaysburg and Johnstown Pennsylvania. Ebensburg, PA: the Authors. 
    Baumgardner was historian of the Cambria County Chapter of the Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the American Revolution and Hoenstine was president of the Blair County Chapter of the S.A.R.  This publication was done in commemoration of a meeting and banquet of the two chapters at the Summit Mansion House on June 14, 1952.  The book includes a collection of materials that present information about the engineering and economic realities faced during the construction and operation of the Allegheny Old Portage Railroad.  The Old Portage surmounted the Allegheny mountains by use of a series of levels and inclined planes.  It was part of the Public Works canal and railroad system, which was eventually purchased by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in 1857.  The Old Portage Railroad began operations in 1834 and was replaced in 1855 by the New Portage Railroad, which eliminated the need to use inclined planes.  The book opens with a one-page chronology of the Old Portage beginning with the appointment of the Board of Canal Commissioners on March 21, 1824 and ending with the closing of the canal between Hollidaysburg and Williamsburg on April 22, 1872.  Some interesting events included in the chronology include the first track of the Old Portage put in operation in 1834, the second track put in operation in 1835, the remains of President Harrison conveyed over the Portage Railroad in 1841, wire rope first used in 1842, Public Works purchased by the PRR on June 15, 1857, and the New Portage Railroad dismantled by the PRR on November 1, 1857.  The book then presents information about the Summit Hotel formerly known as the Summit Mansion House.  Built 1832-1834, it was a very busy hotel while the Portage Railroad was in operation.  The book also reprints parts of an account by Peregrine Prolix, pen name for an English traveler, describing an 1836 trip over the Old Portage Railroad.  Also included are extracts from a report to the Canal Commissioners of Pennsylvania by Sylvester Welch, the Engineer of the Allegheny Portage.  The most significant portion of the book is a reprint of William Bender Wilson’s The Evolution, Decadence and Abandonment of the Allegheny Portage Railroad, which was originally published in The Pennsylvania Railroad Men’s News in 1897.  See also: Allegheny Portage Railroad (1930).  (90 pages, book, obtained from University of Minnesota Duluth Library)
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  14. Bernhart, Benjamin L. (2006). Pennsylvania Railroad in the Schuylkill River Valley: along the historic Reading Main Line. . Dauberville, Pa. : Outer Station Project.
    (156 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  15. Bezilla, Michael. (1980). Electric traction on the Pennsylvania Railroad, 1895-1968. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
    This case study of PRR electrification was based upon Bezilla's 1978 Ph.D. thesis at Penn State.  It presents a synthesis of the technological, economic, political, and social issues regarding Pennsy's electrification, which occurred between 1905 and 1938 from New York to Philadelphia, Washington, and Harrisburg.  Bezilla obtained much of his information from the engineering and managerial records of the company, and he illuminates the technical challenges and difficult corporate decision-making that were faced.  In his July 1981 review in American Historical Review, Henwood said, "This is a fascinating book.  The author has done an excellent job of analyzing and appraising the technological and managerial elements of this vast undertaking."  (233 pages, bib., book)
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  16. Blardone, Charles & Tilp, Peter. (1988). Pennsylvania Railroad: passenger car painting and lettering. Upper Darby, PA: Pennsylvania Railroad Technical and Historical Society.
    In the forward of this book, Blardone and Tilp explain, "This is a book about the paint and lettering schemes applied to the Pennsylvania Railroad's large roster of steel and stainless-steel cars during the middle years of the twentieth century."  Although this book provides many professional photographs of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and the Pullman Company, it is not just another picture book.  It presents the history of the PRR paint schemes for the modeler, the serious student, or the casual browser.  Relevant facts and figures including information about the style, size, and location of lettering and paint/color schemes for PRR passenger cars are presented.  The book focuses on passenger cars during the six decades following the opening of New York's Penn Station in 1910, and it emphasizes 1930-1958 (the "modern era").  113 photographs are used along with illustrations, company tracings, and charts.  Color samples are also included.  (127 pages, book, examined at the Library of Congress)
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  17. Brigham, Albert Perry. (1907). From trail to railway through the Appalachians. Boston: Ginn & Company.
    In the preface Brigham states that he attempted to promote elementary geography and history of the eastern United States in this little book.  The travel and westward movement of people over the Appalachian Mountains is the focus of the work, which blends geography and history together and reads much like a guide book.  Only one of the fourteen chapters is devoted to the Pennsylvania Railroad.  Other chapters cover the Erie Canal, the New York Central Railway, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, westward journeys from Philadelphia, Kentucky by the Cumberland Gap, and others topics.  The thirteen-page chapter on the PRR presents a very brief history of the Allegheny Portage and the PRR.  The reader is then taken on a journey from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh with discussions of various locations in between including Lancaster, Harrisburg and its “splendid new bridge”, the Juniata valley, the Bald Eagle valley, Altoona and its PRR shops, the “great loop, or bend” near Altoona, Johnstown and the flood of 1889, Braddock, and Pittsburg.  The PRR’s efforts to enter New York City via tunnels, then in progress, are also briefly mentioned.  A few small black-and-white photographs are also added including Broad Street Station in Philadelphia, PRR bridge near Harrisburg, PRR shops at Altoona, and the Horseshoe Curve.  The book contains and index at the end.  (188 pages, book, obtained from University of Minnesota Libraries)
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  18. Brooks, Terrence. (1964). Pennsylvania Railroad: the early days. Los Angeles: Trans-Anglo books. 
    This 50-page paperback booklet was originally published as volume 1, number 3 (July 1964) of Railway History Quarterly.  In it, Brooks provides a very informative and interesting brief chronicle of the PRR's beginnings, including the development and acquisition of its basic extensions.  He begins by outlining the importance of the building of the PRR to the commercial development of the city of Philadelphia and the fund raising efforts that were required to build the railroad over the Allegheny Mountains. Of course the work of John Edgar Thomson, first as chief engineer and later as president, is lauded.  His knowledge of civil engineering, railroad operations, finance, and organization was essential to the PRR's early growth.  Brooks points out that there were no "guide books" for railroad building in the mid-1800s, so the PRR engineers had "to proceed on a test-and-try basis" that often caused delays and increased costs.  Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this chronicle is its coverage of the political and financial struggles that were surmounted to build the PRR during the early years.  Brooks advises that the PRR was declared officially completed on November 1, 1855 when it connected Harrisburg to Pittsburgh.  He then briefly discusses the expansion of the PRR through acquisition of other key rail lines, including the state-owned Philadelphia and Columbia, the Ohio and Pennsylvania, the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago, and others.  (50 pages, booklet, obtained from Illinois State Library, Springfield, IL)
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  19. Bryant, Keith L., Jr. (Ed.). (1988). Encyclopedia of American business history and biography: railroads in the age of regulation, 1900-1980. New York: Facts On File.
    The Encyclopedia of American Business History and Biography chronicles America's material civilization through its businesses and its business leadership.  It presents a history of the impact of business on American life.  This volume focuses on railroads from 1900 to 1980, and of course it includes much information about the Pennsylvania Railroad and its leadership.  The following primary Pennsylvania Railroad entries present much useful information including references: *Pennsylvania Railroad by Michael Bezilla, pp336-338, *W.W. Atterbury by Michael Bezilla, pp16-21, *John W. Barriger III by George W. Hilton, pp27-30, *Martin W. Clement by Michael Bezilla, pp87-91, *Leonor F. Loree by Herbert H. Harwood, Jr., pp259-267, *James McCrea by Michael Bezilla, pp288-290, *Samuel Rea by Michael Bezilla, pp359-363, *W. Thomas Rice by James A. Ward, pp368-370, *Stuart T. Saunders by Richard Saunders, pp386-391, *James M. Symes by Michael Bezilla, pp425-429.  There are many other entries in the book that provide information about the Pennsylvania Railroad, which can be identified using the detailed index at the end of the book.  The following list includes some additional topics from the index that are relevant to the PRR: *dieselization, *electrification, *Lehigh Valley takeover, *Long Island Railroad takeover, *Norfolk & Western divestiture, *Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines, *rate wars, *Southern Railway Security Company. (book, examined at the South Dakota State University Library, Bookings, SD)
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  20. Burgess, George H., & Kennedy, Miles C. (1976, c1949). Centennial history of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 1846 - 1946. New York: Arno Press.
    This is a reprint of the 1949 edition published by The Pennsylvania Railroad Company (see PRR Company Publications).

  21. Caloroso, Bill. (1993). Pennsylvania Railroad's Elmira Branch. Andover, NJ: Andover Junction Publications.
    Caloroso was born in Elmira, NY, where his family's home was on the south Side of Elmira about 250 feet from Pennsy's Southport Yard.  He presents a thorough (and sometimes personal) view of the PRR's Elmira Branch which reached over 144 miles north from Williamsport, PA, through Elmira, NY, to Lake Canandaigua, with a 34 mile spur to Lake Ontario at Sodus Point, NY.  He offers chapters on the history, motive power, and operations of the branch which hauled passengers, produce, and some general freight, but was probably most important for transporting coal for shipment at Sodus Point.  Caloroso also includes chapters covering the towns along the branch, more than 160 photographs (mostly black-and-white), and five railroad maps covering the entire branch and details of individual communities.  In addition he provides a few "Pennsy People" sidebars focusing on employees and their memories of the Elmira Branch where steam remained the predominant motive power until the middle 1950s.  About 50% of the photographs reproduced in this book were taken by Lloyd Hall, whose photographs are featured in Trackside around Sayre-Towanda-Waverly with Lloyd Hall by Jeremy F. Plant and Bill Caloroso.  The Trackside book presents 21 additional PRR Elmira Branch photographs that do not appear in this book.  (96 pages, book)
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  22. Carleton, Paul. (1977). Under Pennsy wires. River Vale, NJ: D. Carleton Railbooks.
    Carleton states in his 1977 foreword that the purpose of this book is to "relive Pennsy's pioneer attempts at electrification, then move on through the golden years and bask in the glow of the greatest electric installation of its time and finally brings this coverage down to our day".  He conveys this story of the Pennsy's extraordinary electrified lines with interesting text and splendid black-and-white photographs (over 500 of them).  He also includes appropriate previously published material such as Pennsy press releases, advertisements, articles from the company magazine (The Pennsy), timetables, and maps.  The building of the electrified physical plant is covered with the help of about 22 pages of material taken from a 1925 press report and a Westinghouse booklet published in 1935.  The author substituted similar photographs in these portions of the book due to the poor quality of the original pictures.  Carleton provides excellent coverage of the electric locomotives of the PRR in a 118-page section entitled "The Motors Which Made It all Work".  He reminds the reader that "technically an electric is not a locomotive because the energy source is not self-contained".  The "motors" are arranged by class in order of development, and numerous photographs of each class are included.   A 23-page section covers the "electric motors" during the Penn Central days.  The book then discusses the Pennsy's east end affiliates, its distinguished passenger service, including its service to commuters, and finishes the story with the metroliners, Amtrak, and Conrail.  (320 pages, book)
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  23. Carleton, Paul. (1989). Pennsy steam: A to T. Dunnellon, FL: D.Carleton Railbooks. 
    This is Carleton's second book on PRR steam locomotives.  He referred to his first, Pennsy, A to T, as a "little book for steam enthusiasts everywhere".  It was a modest 96-page effort that presented photographs and very brief text covering PRR steam locomotives grouped by class.  Although Carleton uses a very similar format in Pennsy Steam: A to T it is a much more satisfying product than the previous work.  It presents more substantive information about the Pennsy's steam locomotives through more informative text and a large number of better-quality black-and-white photographs  (over 440 of them) than the former work.  The "A to T" in the title is taken from Pennsy's steam power classification system that classed its locomotives by progressive letters from A for 0-4-0s through T for 4-4-4-4s.  This book is organized according to this alphabetic sequence and presents information and photos describing the locomotives of each wheel arrangement.  Also included are a PRR system map, several Pennsy illustrated advertisements, and a chapter written by Bert Pennypacker covering the history of the I1 class (Decapod) locomotives entitled "Dinosaurs of the Alleghenies."  (208 pages, book)
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  24. Carleton, Paul. (1991). Pennsy steam: a second look. Dunnellon, FL: D. Carleton Railbooks.
    Carleton's "second look" at steam motive power development on the Pennsylvania Railroad is his third book covering PRR steam locomotives.  Second Look is intended to compliment the previous works, Pennsy, A to T and Pennsy Steam: A to T.  It begins with a discussion of steam locomotive development in the early 1800s and details this development on the Pennsy through the decline of steam.  Included is information about the engineering designs of the locomotives, the most influential mechanical engineers that contributed their expertise to the PRR, the numbers of units constructed and places of construction.  The story is told with the use of approximately 450 black-and-white photographs and illustrations of locomotives, the presentation of technical data, and a very effective narrative.  The author used written material form M.W. Clement, former PRR President, other PRR official publications, as well as material published in newspapers and Baldwin Locomotives.  Also included is a chapter written by C.B. "Bert" Pennypacker that outlines the PRR's final steam power.  (208 pages, book)
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  25. Carleton, Paul. (1995). A Pennsy diesel power review. Dunnellon, FL: D. Carleton Railbooks.
    For the first time, Carleton addresses diesel power development on the Pennsylvania Railroad in book form.  He has produced three previous books about Pennsy steam power and one about Pennsy electrification.  Like the previous Carleton books, this one presents numerous black-and-white photographs (over 430 of them) showing working PRR locomotives (diesel in this case).  The author uses the photographs, with descriptive captions, and brief introductory text at the beginning of each chapter to document the story of the diesel locomotives that worked for the PRR.  The book begins with a chapter written by Bert Pennypacker that describes the transformation of the PRR from steam to diesel motive power during the period from 1945 to 1957. It then provides a feeling for diesel locomotive operations on the PRR from a railroad fans perspective including "train watching" photographs at Duncannon, Altoona, and the Horseshoe Curve, and descriptions of a few railfan excursions.  Pages 69 through 223 finish the story with chapters that present photographs of Pennsy diesel locomotives produced by each locomotive works.  The American Locomotive Company, The Baldwin Locomotive Works, The Electro Motive Division of General Motors, Fairbanks Morse, and Lima Hamilton are covered in these chapters.  (224 pages, book)
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  26. Carleton, Paul, & Carleton, Daphne. (1962). Pennsy, A to T: PRR steam picture history. Fairview, NJ: P. & D. Carleton. 
    The authors state that they were pleased to "produce this little book for steam enthusiasts everywhere".  It presents over 140 black-and-white photographs of PRR steam locomotives.  The photographs are grouped together by categories such as the Atlantics, including photos of E-1, E-2, E-2c, E-3sd, E-5s, and E-6s locomotives, or the Consolidations, including photos of H-3, H-6sb, H-8sa, H-9s, H-10s, and HH-1 locomotives.  Other categories include Switchers, Eight Wheelers, Moguls, Ten Wheelers, Decapod, Texas, Pacifics, Mikado, Mountain, and Duplex.  At the beginning of each category brief technical data including the wheel arrangements, weights, boiler pressures, cylinder sizes, and tractive efforts are presented.  In addition a very brief, and somewhat erratic, narrative covering the development of switchers, freight power, and passenger power is presented at the beginning of "this little book".  (96 pages, book)
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  27. Chesley, Alan B. (1982). Cabin cars of the Pennsylvania and Long Island Railroads. Hicksville, NY: N.J. International, Inc. 
    This book is number 2 in the publisher's Caboose Data Book series.  It begins with a forty-page section that presents photographs (many in color) and schematic drawings, with measurements, of PRR wood and steel cabin cars. Very short captions provide the only textual information.  The following cabin car classes are covered in the PRR section: NC, ND, N5, N5a, N5b, N5c, N6B, N6A, N8, and N5E.  The next seventeen-page section presents similar information for LIRR cabin cars including classes, N52A, N22A, N22B, N52B (Ex O&W), and (Ex IC).  A five-page section describing air brake and safety appliances for cabin cars is added at the end of the book.  (64 pages, book)
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  28. Chesley, Alan B. (1984). Pennsylvania Railroad heavyweight passenger equipment and photo book. Hicksville, NY: N.J. International, Inc.
    Similar to Chesley's Cabin cars of the Pennsylvania and Long Island Railroads this book presents 80+ photographs (mostly black-and-white) of PRR equipment with accompanying foldout schematic illustrations.  Chesley's illustrations show measurements and structural designs of at least two sides, i.e., side and end views, and many show all four sides. Interior drawings are not provided.  The works of several photographers are included, although most photographs are by George Votava.  Very brief captions are provided.  As the title indicates this book covers passenger equipment including, baggage cars, reefers, combines, coaches, cafe coaches, railway post office cars, diners, business cars, parlor observation cars, track inspection cars, horse express cars, theatrical scenery express cars, and Brill and Pullman gas electric cars.  A chart listing the number of cars by type in July 1923, December 1930, and January 1940 is provided.  At the end an explanation of the PRR passenger truck classification system is provided along with a listing of specifications for each passenger truck classification, e.g., 2C-P3, 3C-P1, etc. (119 pages, book)
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  29. Condit, Carl W. (1980). The port of New York: a history of the rail and terminal system from the beginnings to Pennsylvania Station. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
    Condit believes that understanding movement on (and above and below) both land and water are critical to understanding the history of a city.  This book focuses on the genesis, growth, operations, and urban consequences of the New York rail and terminal system with particular emphasis on the electrified railroad passenger stations, i.e., Grand Central Station and Pennsylvania Station. His technological history begins with New York and New Jersey rail lines before 1885 and progresses through the development and construction of the first Grand Central Depot, the New Jersey terminals, including the Pennsylvania terminal at Jersey City, and a background of railroad electrification in New York.  He then discussed in detail (more than 100 pages) the development and construction of Pennsylvania Station and the electrification of the Pennsylvania and its subsidiaries.  See also: Couper (1912), Middleton (1996), Parissien (1996), Westing (1978). (431 pages, bib, book, obtained from South Dakota State University)
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  30. Couper, William. (Ed.). (1912). History of the engineering construction and equipment of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company's New York terminal and approaches. New York: Isaac H. Blanchard Company.
    Couper edited a very informative book, which contains a description of Penn Station's architectural and engineering details including the river tunnels that were an essential component of direct rail entrance to Manhattan Island.  A brief history of this massive engineering and construction effort is included as a forward.  A section dealing with the dedication of the Cassatt memorial at Penn Station on August 1, 1910 provides a tribute to the late A.J. Cassatt whose leadership and hard work as president of the PRR made this engineering project possible.  This section also provides photographs of, and biographical information about, PRR leadership including James McCrea, President, Samuel Rea, First Vice President, Albert John County, Assistant to First Vice President, and Charles Walker Raymond, Chairman of the Board of Engineers in charge of the Company's New York tunnel extension.  Most chapters in Couper's book are written by men who played leadership roles in the engineering and construction project.  The Meadows, North River, and East River divisions are covered along with Manhattan Transfer, electric traction, and station construction including its architectural motif.  Numerous photographs of construction scenes and people are included along with 14 pages of 1912 advertising at the end.  See Westing, Fred (1978) for a reprint and additional information.  See also: Condit (1980), Middleton (1996), Parissien (1996). (131 pages, book)
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  31. Couper, William (Ed.). (1912). A publication descriptive of the development on the lines of Pennsylvania Railroad, within one hundred miles of New York City Penna. terminal. New York: Isaac H. Blanchard Co.
    This seems to be a slightly expanded version of Couper's History of the Engineering Construction and Equipment of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company's New York Terminal and Approaches which was also published by Blanchard Co. in 1912.  In addition to the same information included in the shorter work, this publication presents a few short sections covering other locations served by the Pennsylvania or smaller railroads connecting to the Pennsylvania in the New York City vicinity.  Elizabeth, Colonia, and Metuchen, NJ are included, as is the Raritan River Railroad.  Also much more advertising is included.  (165 pages, book)
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  32. Cudahy, Brian J. (1975). Rails under the mighty Hudson: the story of the Hudson Tubes, the Pennsy Tunnels and Manhattan Transfer. Brattleboro, VT: Stephen Greene Press.
    Cudahy produced a remarkable little book that is packed with substantive information about Pennsy operations in New York City.  Part one covers the construction of the Hudson Tubes, which were financed and directed by William Gibbs McAdoo, a Georgia-born lawyer.  The first tube under the Hudson to Hobokan was completed in 1908 and the second tubes linking Jersey City with Manhattan were completed in 1909.  Cudahy’s description of early tunneling techniques is very informative.  Part two covers the PRR’s New York Tunnel Extension.  In 1871 the Pennsylvania Railroad extended its service across New Jersey to the banks of the Hudson.  It was the import-export freight traffic that motivated the PRR to enter New York City.  However passenger service quickly became the more glamorous commodity once the lines were established.  PRR president A.J. Cassatt was very enthusiastic about underwater tunnels and electric locomotive power when he returned from a visit to the Orleans Railway in Paris in 1901.  He appointed Samuel Rea, a Pennsy vice-president, to head a study team that included George Gibbs, who would later provide leadership to PRR electrification efforts, and others.  The team’s final proposal included: 1) a five-mile two-track line that would take the PRR main line across Jersey Meadows; 2) a pair of tunnels beneath Jersey Palisades and the Hudson River into Manhattan; 3) a stunning passenger terminal in Manhattan at 33rd Street and 7th Avenue (Pennsylvania Station); 4) a four-track subway tunnel cross-town from the terminal under the East River to Long Island City; 5) construction of a major storage and repair facility (Sunnyside Yard) in Long Island City; 6) electrification of the entire project with 650-volt direct current over-riding third rail and the design of an electric locomotive (DD-1); 7) construction of an interchange point between steam and electricity in Jersey Meadows (Manhattan Transfer).  The final price was $116 million when the project was finished in 1910.  The PRR’s East River tubes were completed before the Hudson tunnels and the Long Island Rail Road began operations into Manhattan on September 8, 1910.  On November 26, 1910 the main area of Penn Station opened and the first train to carry passengers west out of the station and under the Hudson River departed on November 27th.   Cudahy provides very interesting information about Penn Station and Manhattan Transfer.  On March 12, 1913, President Samuel Rea announced that the PRR’s board of directors had voted to spend $4 million to electrify suburban service out of Philadelphia using a system of 11,000-volt alternating current distributed from overhead catenaries.  By 1933 the wires stretched all the way to Penn Station, and on January 16th a box-cab, P-5a locomotive pulled train number 207 out of Penn Station all the way to Philadelphia with no engine change.  The closing of Manhattan Transfer on June 20, 1937 received more press coverage outside of New York than did the opening of Penn Station in 1910.  Part three of the book covers the declines of the 1960s and 1970s and the Epilogue presents a tribute to Penn Station.  The book includes many photographs, track diagrams, and maps.  (79 pages, book, obtained from the State of Alabama Public Library Service)
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  33. Cupper, Dan. (1992). Crossroads of commerce: the Pennsylvania Railroad calendar art of Grif Teller. (Ken Murry, photographer). Richmond, VT: Great Eastern Publishing.
    Cupper, Murry, and Great Eastern have produced a beautiful book that merges railroading and art.  The book focuses on the life and work of Grif Teller, the artist who worked for the Osborne Company that printed the PRR's annual calendars.  From 1925 to 1958 twenty-seven of Grif Teller's paintings graced the annual Pennsylvania Railroad calendars.  Cupper skillfully illuminates the PRR's legend.  He then provides intriguing coverage of Teller's life and development as an artist and presents a brief history of the Osborne Company and the PRR's calendar program.  However the major attraction and unique aspect of this work is the lavish full-color presentation of each of the calendar paintings including those painted by artists other than Teller.  Each work is displayed on a full-right-hand-page with detailed background and contextual information printed on the opposite (left) page.  The book also presents color reproductions of some of teller's PRR paintings that were not selected and several of his commissioned paintings.  The Pennsylvania Railroad calendar art was commercial art intended to glorify the mighty PRR and they certainly achieved their intended purpose.  However Cupper and Murry remind us that the calendars were more than commercial art, they were an amalgam of railroading, commerce and artistry.  This book will appeal to anyone interested in any of those three aspects of life.  More than 140 paintings are beautifully reproduced along with numerous photographs.  (184 pages, book)
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  34. Cupper, Dan. (1993). Horseshoe heritage: The story of a great railroad landmark. Halifax, PA: Withers Publishing.
    This "Official publication of the Horseshoe Curve National Historic Landmark" is an attractively packaged paperback presenting more than 100 photographs and illustrations (mostly black-and-white) within its 57, 8.5 by 11 inch, pages.  Cupper presents a lucid and concise summary of the development and history of the curve including the hazards of mountain railroading on Pennsylvania's Allegheny Mountains.  He chronicles the Curves importance and popularity over the years and commemorates the construction and opening in 1993 of the Horseshoe Curve National Historic Landmark, which includes a visitors' center for exhibits and a park-like setting with an inclined plane to take visitors to the tracks.  (57 pages, book)
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  35. Davis, Milton A. (1977). The 50 best of PRR: book one, a portfolio of the favorite fifty photographs from the camera and collection of the well-known PRR photo-historian. Baltimore, MD: Barnard, Roberts & Co.
    This is the first in a series of four books each devoted to Pennsylvania Railroad photographs by a single photographer and/or photographs from the collection of a single photo-historian.  This book presents 45 black-and-white photographs taken by Milton A. Davis and seven shots by unknown photographers taken from his collection.  Mr. Davis was born in Baltimore in 1920, the son of a motorman for the United Railway & Electric Company and nephew of a PRR employee.  Although Mr. Davis was not a railroad employee, he began photographing locomotives in 1936, and most of the photographs in this book were captured in the forties.  The photographs are presented in a 6 X 10-inch or 8 X 10-inch format and all captions are written by Charles Roberts. See also: Herbert Harwood (1978) and Bob Lorenz (1979).  (52 pages, book)
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  36. Davis, Patricia T. (1978). End of the line: Alexander J. Cassatt and the Pennsylvania Railroad. New York: Neale Watson Academic Publications, Inc.
    Davis' portrait of the seventh president (1899-1906) of the Pennsylvania Railroad is not a scholarly work.  She provides only a short bibliography, no footnotes, and the book contains several factual errors.  However using an extensive collection of family letters, the Cassatt presidential letter books, corporate materials, and the reminiscences of Cassatt family members, Davis has produced an interesting and valuable sketch of the life and character of this important figure of railroad management history.  She reveals Cassatt's loyalty to the company and his callous insensitivity to labor during the 1877 Pittsburgh labor strike and riots while Cassatt was a third vice president of the PRR.  She also reveals Cassatt's strength and ruthlessness in his struggles with industrialists like John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, J.P. Morgan, and George Gould to end the practice of railroad rebates, and fight off competition.  His destruction of 1,500 miles of Western Union telegraph wire and over 60,000 poles in one day serves as testimony of his ruthlessness.  Davis also covers what was perhaps Casatt's greatest contribution, his initiation of the PRR's movement of its eastern terminal from the west bank of the Hudson River to the heart of Manhattan via a tunnel system and the construction of Pennsylvania Station in mid-town Manhattan.  Although not completed until 1910, after Cassatt's death, his contributions were invaluable for this project.  (208 pages, book)
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  37. Davis, Patricia Talbot. (1994). The railroad general, William Wallace Atterbury. Atlanta, GA: Metro Printing.
    General William Wallace Atterbury was the tenth president of the Pennsylvania Railroad, 1925-1935.  Many have said the Atterbury was perhaps the most able and successful of the PRR's chief executives.  William Wallace Atterbury, Jr. and George R. Atterbury, the sons of William Wallace Atterbury commissioned Davis, to write this book about their father.  In addition to published and company records much information from Atterbury's sons including family records, letters, scrapbooks, and intimate recollections of his private life were used to enrich this account of Atterbury's life.  Atterbury was born the twelfth child of a Presbyterian minister in New Albany, IN, on January 31, 1866 and he grew up in Detroit.  Davis provides family Atterbury history back to Huguenot emigration to New York in 1687.  Atterbury graduated from Yale's Sheffield Scientific School in 1886.  His brother Charles, a railroad attorney, helped him get a position with the PRR in the Altoona shops where most PRR executives began their careers.  He began the mechanics apprentice course, but quickly worked his way through numerous promotions.  By 1892 he was appointed Master Mechanic of the Pennsylvania and was sent to Fort Wayne, IN.  In 1902 Pennsylvania President, Cassatt, appointed Atterbury as general manager of Lines East over several more senior company executives.  The youngest general manager the PRR had ever had moved to Philadelphia.  In 1909 he was appointed as fifth vice president.  In 1917, Atterbury was tapped by General Pershing to manage the portion of the French railway controlled by the American Expeditionary Force.  Atterbury was given the rank of brigadier general and received many awards including the Distinguished Serves Medal.  After the war Atterbury resumed his duties as PRR vice president in charge of operations.  On October 1, 1925, Atterbury was elected to replace Samuel Rea as the Pennsylvania's tenth president.  Perhaps Atterbury's most significant achievement as president was the electrification of the New York to Washington, D.C. lines.  Atterbury believed in electrification as the answer to dwindling revenues during the late 1920s.  He pushed hard to make electrification a reality even though it was the largest capital improvement program ever undertaken to that date by an American railroad and the nation plunged into severe economic depression in 1929 shortly after the work had begun.  This is a very personal look at a very private and unassuming man whose played a major role in the industrial growth of this country.  Davis includes a short bibliography.  (205 pages, book, examined at the Library of Congress)
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  38. De Angeli, Marguerite. (1977). Whistle for the Crossing. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company.
    In this children’s novel, Eddie Andrew Moore lived near Philadelphia with his sister, Lavinia, and their father, Edward Terhorst Moore in a community named Penn’s Manor on banks of the Delaware River.  The story takes place in 1852 and Eddie’s father was an engineer on the Camden and Amboy Railroad.  However, Mr. Moore was asked by the officers of the Pennsylvania Railroad to operate the first train run from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh and then to remain as an engineer with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in Pittsburgh.  The story describes Eddie’s exciting ride on that first train trip between the two cities with his father as the engineer.  The story is typical children’s material, but provides some understanding of what the trip must have been like, along with some historical and geographic information.  The book explains that previously trains had been running on the Main Line of the Pennsy only as far as Columbia, where the Juniata River runs along side.  From Columbia freight was transported on to Pittsburgh by canalboat.  The 1852 trip was the first covering the complete distance on “steel rails” and it took three days and two nights.  The locomotive’s name was F.K. Heisley and the train consisted of one freight car and one passenger car.  Many stops were made along the way to pick up supplies, i.e., water and wood which had been stashed at appropriate intervals, and for food and overnight hotel or boardinghouse accommodations.  Locations mentioned during the trip included Fairmount Park (“the largest park in the world”), Paoli, Downingtown, Lancaster (Amishmen were abundant), Harrisburg, the Rockville Bridge (the new one built two years earlier), Altoona (Indians lived near there and Eddie had a friendly encounter with them while a hotbox was being attended to), Hollidaysburg, Johnstown, and McKeesport.  In the Allegheny Mountains the story included a stationary engine that hauled the train up an inline and then eased it down the other side.  Although the book is not intended to provide totally accurate information about the actual first run, I found it to be appropriate for children and mildly interesting. (107 pages, fiction book for children, obtained from Siouxland Libraries, Sioux Falls, SD).
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  39. DeRouin, Edward M. & Speir, George G. (1999). Trackside around Chicago 1957-1965 with George G. Speir. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Robert Yanosey and Morning Sun Books’ Trackside series presents the amazing work of many railroad photographers who worked in many different locations from the 1940s through the mid-1970s. This book is number 13 in the Trackside Series and it features the color photographs of George G. Speir.  DeRouin provides a brief introduction covering the life and work of the photographer, an overview of the railroad history of Chicago, and several railroad maps of the area.  Like the other books in this series, the photographs included in this book present beautiful images of railroad equipment and settings from bygone days around the designated city, i.e., in this case Chicago.  DeRouin selected many stunning photographs for this book and added informative captions.  Any railroad enthusiast should enjoy this book. Unfortunately only 5 pages, and about 14 photos, are devoted to the Pennsylvania Railroad. (128 pages, book)
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  40. Diehl, Lorraine B. (1985). The late, great Pennsylvania Station. New York: American Heritage Press (also Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company).
    In an interview with Amazon.com Lorraine Diehl advised that she grew up in the station’s shadow.  “When it was destroyed, it took a part of me with it.”  This book conveys Ms. Diehl’s love for the station that was built to last centuries, but only stood for little more than 50 years from 1910 until its 1963-64 demolition.  Diehl briefly covers the history of the PRR’s New York City passenger service and then concentrates on the design and construction of the tunnels and the station.  She describes the impact of PRR president, Alexander Cassatt, and discusses the work of the architectural fim of McKim, Mead and White who had previously made its imprint on New York City with many impressive structures.  Diehl also discusses the important impact the station had on New York and the US society during its 50+ year history.  Her coverage of the demise of the station is both informative and touching.  Her last paragraph quotes a New York Times editorial from October 30, 1963, “We will probably be judged not by the monuments we build but by those we have destroyed.”  The forward by Kent Barwick, President of the Municipal Art Society of New York, states that the destruction of Pennsylvania Station precipitated a preservation movement that lead to New York’s landmarks law that prohibits the destruction of other architectural treasures in the city.  Diehl includes 80 vintage photographs, a brief bibliography and an index.  Also, her Late, Great Pennsylvania Station web site (http://members.aol.com/pennsy) presents brief information and several photographs including an exterior view, the arcade, the main waiting room, the concourse, and carriageways.  The author conducts free tours of the remnants of Pennsylvania Station on the fourth Monday of each month.  The book was also published by Forbes Custom Publishing in 1985 and reprinted by Viking Penguin in 1987 and by Four Walls Eight Windows in 1996.  (168 pages, book, obtained from the Erie County Public Library)
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  41. Dietz, Paul C. (2001). Firing on the Pennsy: a fireman on the Pennsylvania Railroad describes the “Last Hurrah” of the steam engine 1943-1947. Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, Inc. 
    Shortly after his 87th birthday Mr. Dietz decided to record some memories of his days firing locomotives for the Pennsylvania Railroad.  The reader is rewarded by a rich description of the work of a fireman and the technology of the steam locomotive.  What enabled Mr. Dietz to create this remarkable record was the library of old time books that informed him of the details of each of his PRR working days more than half a century in the past.  Each entry in the books contained the name of the train, the type and number of the engine, the name of the engineman, the pick-up point and destination of the train, the time he went off duty, the number of miles traveled, the hours he worked and the pay he earned for that tour of duty.  These records helped evoke vivid memories of Mr. Dietz's experiences as a fireman on the Pennsy during the 1940s.  In addition to revealing the sometimes monotonous, sometimes grueling, often exciting, and sometimes dangerous work of the fireman, Mr. Dietz also provides much information and insight regarding the equipment that he worked with, including the Westinghouse air brake, locomotive boilers, the Johnson bar (reverse lever), stokers, scooping water, and other information about steam locomotives and the operation of the PRR.  Mr. Dietz hired out in 1943 in Canton, Ohio and worked mostly out of Crestline, Ohio, which was the terminal point between the Eastern Division and the Fort Wayne Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  In this book he recounts experiences and information about hostling and firing on pusher services, through freights, local freights, passenger runs, and in the yard.  He also describes in detail the responsibilities of the fireman, along with some insight into the responsibilities of the engineman, and other train crew members.  In addition, he recounts detailed experiences of selected work days or runs and gives the reader a feel for what the life of a fireman was like.  I really enjoyed this book.  I believe it compares favorably with the much longer and more developed “Set up Running” by John W. Orr.  I highly recommend both the Dietz and Orr titles.  (97 pages, book)
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  42. Dredge, James. (1879). The Pennsylvania Railroad: its organization, construction, and management. New York: John Wiley and Sons.
    This monumental work presents a unique view of the early Pennsylvania Railroad.  Dredge wrote and compiled it for the Offices of Engineering in London and states that his objective was to describe the condition of American railroad practice in its most advanced form.  He characterizes the European opinion of American railroads to include features such as "flimsiness of construction, and looseness in working."   However he admits that some American railroads (especially the Pennsylvania) equal or exceed European standards.  This work presents a very detailed description of the PRR including its history, physical plant (buildings, road bed, shops, etc.), locomotives, rolling stock, and business aspects.  One hundred seven illustrations and eighty-two plates containing detailed technical drawings of locomotives, rolling stock, buildings and equipment are included along with much tabular data in this large-format (11 x 14.5 inches) publication.  (274 pages, book)
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  43. Durham, Robert K. (1995). The Pennsylvania Railroad. Auburn, PA: Author.
    The cover title on this book describes it fairly well, Pennsylvania Steam - Locomotives and Trains Photographed in Northern New Jersey - 1931-1938 from the collection of Robert K. Durham.  The book consists of about fifty black-and-white photographs of Pennsy locomotives, most taken by the author.  The photographs are intended to present a sampling of the most prevalent locomotive types used by the PRR at Jersey City and Newark during those years.  Very little text is included and only very brief photo captions indicate the PRR engine number, classification and the date each photograph was taken.  Except for thirteen electric locomotives, all the photographs picture steam locos.  Durham states that he enlarged the photos to the published 6.5 x 9.5 inch format from 2.25 x 3.5 inch negatives.  Unfortunately several photographs are not very clear.  (80 pages, book)
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  44. Edson, William D. (1974). Keystone steam & electric: a record of steam and electric locomotives built for the Pennsylvania Railroad since 1906. New York: Wayner Publications.
    Edson records the steam and electric locomotives built for the Pennsy since 1906.  The majority of this book consists of a 33-page all-time numerical list of all PRR steam and electric locomotives which have borne numbers followed by 81 pages listing the histories of PRR steam and electric locomotives built since 1906.  The histories are grouped by locomotive class and then listed in numerical order by original locomotive number.  The builder, date of construction, date the locomotive left service and its fate are shown for each locomotive.  Edson used official PRR locomotive registers, shop records at Altoona, and construction lists of locomotive builders to compile this volume.  He also includes brief essays on the history of steam, electric power on the Pennsy, and an explanation of the PRR numbering and classification systems.  In addition he provides a separate list of all engines built at the Juniata Works in Altoona since 1906. (137 pages, bib, book)
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  45. Ewalt, John W. (1992). The last hurrah of the P.R.R. New York: Vantage Press.
    Ewalt presents a very personal look at the Pennsylvania Railroad's final years through a description of his twenty-seven-year employment by the PRR.  Ewalt began his employment in a Sperry car checking for defective rails on the Eastern Division between Pittsburgh and Crestline on August 3, 1936.  He resigned on September 30, 1963, as the company's Director of Real Estate due to unpleasant interactions with David C. Bevan who was Vice President of Finance.  From 1957 through 1963 Ewalt maintains that the PRR showed a profit mainly because of income from the sale and rental of railroad properties.  During 1960-61 Ewalt was instrumental in the sale of Pennsylvania Station in New York to make way for the construction of the new Madison Square Garden, a hotel and a thirty-four-story office building.  Ewalt uses data from PRR annual reports to supplement his remembrance. (156 pages, book)
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  46. Feibelman, W.A. (1979). Rails to Pittsburgh: steam, diesel, and electrics in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania & the east. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company.
    This book showcases the photography of Walter Feibelman who lived in Pittsburgh from 1943 to 1969 and worked as a research engineer at Westinghouse Research Laboratories and as an assistant research professor of physics at the University of Pittsburgh.  Feibelman completed all the layout and paste-up work, wrote the text and photograph captions, and did the associated research.  None of the photographs had been published previously.  The book focuses on late steam and early diesel locomotives during the post-World-War-II years.  Approximately 400 black-and-white photographs are contained in the book.  About half of them depict the Pennsy and over half were taken in the Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania region.  The photos show an unflattering gritty view of working locomotives in the highly industrialized Pittsburgh area before pollution control, and long before the decline of heavy industry in the Steel City.  The photograph captions are short and most do not include dates.  Although there is not much textual information in the book, those interested in the PRR, railroading, or the Pittsburgh area will find it stimulating.  There are many interesting photographs including a series of thirty photos entitled “Altoona Interlude” which takes the reader on a 1949 roundtrip from Pittsburgh to Altoona as seen from the cabs of a Baldwin Sharknose diesel and an EMD E-7.  The trip also includes some shots of locomotives in Altoona.  In addition there are many very interesting shots of yard action, industrial activity, and bridge action in the Pittsburgh area.  The book also presents photographs of motive power from other railroads that serviced the Pittsburgh area, including the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie, the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Union Railroad.  In addition, there are some post-merger shots of the Penn-Central, a section on the New York Central in the East, a section on electrics in the New York-Washington-Harrisburg triangle, some maintenance-of-way equipment photos, a few Amtrak photos and others.  A simplified map of the Pittsburgh area is included along with an index by subjects and an index by locomotive builder, locomotive type/classification, and locomotive number.  See also: Kobus and Consoli (1997) and (1998).  (192 pages, book, obtained from James J. Hill Reference Library, St. Paul, MN)
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  47. Fischer, Ian S. (1996). PRR color guide to freight and passenger equipment, volume 2. Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books, Inc. 
    Fischer provides another look at the Pennsy's diverse and multitudinous fleet of freight and passenger cars.  About 320 high-quality color photographs are presented with informative captions.  Although the PRR was already in a state of decline when most of these photographs were taken in the 1960s, there was still an impressive roster of equipment to be photographed.  Most of these images were captured by Paul C. Winters in Columbus, Ohio, on the Southwest System of Pennsylvania Lines West between Pittsburgh and St. Louis.  The book is organized according to equipment categories such as, lightweight coaches, lightweight sleeping cars, heavyweight coaches, Aerotrain, box cars, flat cars, work equipment, trailers, etc.  Like its predecessor (Sweetland and Yanosey, 1992, PRR Color Guide to Freight and Passenger Equipment) Fischer's book is very useful to railfans, railroad historians, and modelers.  (128 pages, book)
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  48. Fischer, Ian S. (1997). Pennsy steam years 2. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Like the previous Pennsy Steam Years (Sweetland, 1992) Fischer’s second installment is a very entertaining collection of color photographs of PRR steam locomotives.  Over 215 color photographs show PRR (mostly working) steam locomotives during the mid-1950s.  The photographs represent the work of numerous photographers and many of them are stunning.  Like the first volume there are few pages of text, i.e., only two.  However the photograph captions are very informative, presenting much information about the pictured steam locomotives, usually including the locomotive number, builder, construction number, date built, and date and method of final disposition.  In addition, information about the use of the locomotives and design modifications that were implemented on them, and the date of the photographs are often printed.  This book samples the Pennsy’s steam fleet near the end of its life.  “In November 1957 the PRR last used steam engines in its own service.  One hundred and thirty-five steam engines were retained for possible emergency use, but they were never steamed up.”  Fischer states that the historical data about the pictured locomotives were taken from Pennsylvania Railroad All-Time Steam Locomotive Roster published in 1994 by William D. Edson (see also Edson, 1974).  The following locomotive classes are pictured: A5s, B6sb, D16sb, E5s, E6s, H3, H8sb, H9s, H10s, I1sa, J1, J1a, K4s, K4sa, L1s, M1, M1a, M1b, N2s, Q2, and T1.  The photographs are arranged by PRR branch or division.  The following divisions are included: New York, Philadelphia Terminal, Atlantic, Maryland, Wilkes-Barre, Williamsport, Middle, Pittsburgh, Conemaugh, Chicago Terminal, Panhandle, Columbus, Toledo, Logansport, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, and St. Louis.  In addition there are sections on the New York & Long Branch and the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines.  Numerous full-color illustrations taken from PRR advertisements, timetables, and other promotional materials are interspersed among the photographs.  (128 pages, book, obtained from St. Louis County Library)
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  49. Frary, Dave. (1996). The Pennsy middle division in HO scale. Waukesha, WI: Kalmbach Publishing Co.
    This book was assembled from the author’s contributions to Model Railroader Magazine.  It describes the design and construction of an 11 X 16-foot HO scale layout depicting the PRR in September 1950 somewhere between Harrisburg and Altoona.  Many color photographs and diagrams are included.  (64 pages, book, examined at that Library of Congress)
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  50. Frey, Robert L. (Ed.). (1988). Encyclopedia of American business history and biography: railroads in the nineteenth century. New York: Facts On File.
    The Encyclopedia of American Business History and Biography chronicles America's material civilization through its businesses and its business leadership.  It presents a history of the impact of business on American life.  This volume focuses on railroads in the nineteenth century, and of course it includes much information about the Pennsylvania Railroad and its leadership. The following primary Pennsylvania Railroad entries present much useful information including references: Pennsylvania Railroad by James A. Ward, pp313-315; Alexander Johnston Cassatt by Michael Bezilla, pp36-41; Herman Haupt by James A. Ward, pp165-168; John Edgar Thomson by James A. Ward, pp384-390; Thomas A. Scott by James A. Ward, pp358-362; George B. Roberts by Michael Bezilla, pp347-349. There are many other entries in the book that provide information about the Pennsylvania Railroad, which can be identified using the detailed index at the end of the book. The following list includes some additional topics from the index that are relevant to the PRR: air brakes; Atlantic & Richmond Air Line; charter information; Civil War role; Harriman's association; Hudson River tunnels; labor strife; Manhattan terminus; Midwestern line leasing; New York Central competition; Pennsylvania Railroad Lines East; Pennsylvania Station (NYC); Philadelphia & Reading competition; Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore acquisition; Richmond & Danville holdings; rate wars; route expansion; Standard Oil rebate demands; tonnage tax issue; transcontinental expansion; trunk line pool; Union Pacific association; Woodruff sleeping car contract.
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  51. Gladulich, Richard M. (1986). By rail to the boardwalk. Glendale, CA: Trans-Anglo Books.
    Gladulich presents a well-researched very interesting account of the development and operation of rail lines in southern New Jersey.  Atlantic City and other south Jersey coastal towns have served as a major summer playground for residents of Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, and surrounding areas for decades.  The competition to deliver fun-seekers to the shore and back was fierce, and the PRR with its subsidiary, the West Jersey & Seashore, and its rival the Reading with its affiliate, Atlantic City Railroad, were the two major contenders.  The book begins during the second half of the nineteenth century when much of New Jersey was a sparsely populated wilderness.  As industrialization changed the character of cities such as New York and Philadelphia many individuals sought the tranquility of the south Jersey coast.  Dr. Jonathan Pitney, a physician, relocated to the tiny coastal hamlet of Absecon in 1820 where he later decided to build a healthful vacation refuge for city dwellers.  In order to surmount the complete lack of good transportation to his resort he began campaigning for construction of a rail line to the area, which eventually resulted in the formation of the Camden & Atlantic Railroad.  The Camden & Atlantic was purchased by the PRR in 1883, and by the summer of 1885 the profitable Atlantic City passenger business was largely divided between the PRR and the Reading.  Gladulich covers the financial and political struggles of the PRR and the Reading as they sparred for advantage in the south Jersey passenger business during the growth years, 1880s and 1890s, and the expansion years during the early 1900s.  He also covers the increasing labor difficulties that took place during the early 1900s and the federalization of railroads that occurred in 1917 due to the overflow of war materials that needed to be transported to eastern ports.   The severe postwar recession and increased operating costs due to the USRA-imposed work rule changes resulted in significant financial problems for railroads during 1920.  The 1920s also brought significant competition from private automobiles and buses.  Both railroads attempted to meet these challenges by upgrading facilities, equipment, and schedules.  On June 25, 1933 the long-sought merger of the PRR and Reading in southern New Jersey became a reality.  Thus the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines came into existence.  The end of World War II brought more problems to the PRSL when the end of gasoline rationing allowed motorists to take advantage of the state’s well-developed highway system.  New passenger initiatives, the sale of surplus property, and more freight did little to help the PRSL.  Atlantic City and the other south New Jersey shore attractions lost their luster for tourists during the 1960s and 1970s.  Finally the bankruptcies of co-parents Penn Central in June 1970 and Reading in November 1971 was devastating to the PRSL.  In addition to in-depth historical information, Gladulich provides many black-and-white photographs (approximately 500) and many reproductions of railroad promotional materials.  In addition, appendices provide several railroad maps of Atlantic City, a bibliography, and locomotive rosters for the Philadelphia & Atlantic City RR, the Williamstown & Delaware River RR, the Camden Gloucester & Mt. Ephraim RR, the Philadelphia & Seashore RR, the South Jersey RR, the Atlantic City RR, the Camden & Atlantic RR, the West Jersey RR, the West Jersey & Seashore RR, and the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines.  An index is provided at the end of the book.  See also: Kramer (1980).  (331 pages, book, obtained from the St. Louis Mercantile Library and the University of Missouri – St. Louis)
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  52. Gunnarsson, Robert L. (1991). The story of the Northern Central Railway: from Baltimore to Lake Ontario. Sykesville, MD: Greenberg Publishing Company.
    Gunnarsson provides a fairly detailed look at the history of the pioneering Northern Central Railway with roots back to 1828 as the Baltimore & Susquehanna Railroad.  The Northern Central was Baltimore-based and created to serve that city along with the B&O.  It eventually carried coal and, of course, some other commodities and goods between Baltimore MD, Harrisburg PA, Sunbury PA, Williamsport, Elmira NY, and Sodus Point NY on Lake Ontario.  The NC’s connection to the PRR at Harrisburg enabled it to compete with the B&O in the western markets.  This connection also enabled the PRR and the NC to deliver Pennsylvania’s anthracite coal to Baltimore more cheaply than the B&O could deliver Cumberland-area bituminous coal.   In 1861 J. Edgar Thomson and the PRR became a major stockholder of the NC by purchasing over 43,000 shares that had been owned by John W. Garrett, president of the B&O.  The Pennsylvania Railroad purchased another 2,500 shares of Northern Central stock in 1863 increasing their ownership to 33.79 percent of the company.  The PRR became the largest single stockholder and therefore was in a position to exercise working control over the company.  The book discusses the acquisition of numerous other rail lines including the Elmira & Williamsport Railroad, the Chemung Railroad and the Canandaigua Line, the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad, and others.  In the 1870 NC stockholders pressured the company to lease the railroad to the Pennsylvania.  In 1874 the President of the NC and the entire Board of Directors resigned, and the stockholders’ lease committee approached Tom Scott, the Pennsylvania’s new president, about a PRR lease of the Northern Central.  The Pennsylvania’s financial condition at the time could not support the lease, and it was decided that the Northern Central would continue managing its own operations as a separate corporate entity, but the Pennsylvania’s president would also serve as the Northern Centrals’ president.  This relationship continued until July 29, 1914 when the PRR, under president Samuel Rea, executed a 999-year lease of the Northern Central.  The last chapter of the book presents a chronicle of the major events that affected the former NC system after it became an integral part of the PRR system.  The book includes approximately 115 black-and-white photographs, numerous maps and illustrations, locomotive rosters from the 1858 and 1873 Northern Central Railway annual reports, a list of bridges on the NC as of December 1861, a selected bibliography, and an index.  (189 pages, book, obtained from the State of Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery, AL)
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  53. Hahn, John D., Jr. (1995). Pennsylvania Railroad diesel locomotive pictorial, volume 1 - ALCo RS series. Halifax, PA: Withers Publishing.
    This book is volume one in a series planned to document the various types of diesel-electric locomotives operated by the PRR. The book begins with a brief essay written by Paul Withers and Dan Cupper outlining the PRR's relationship with ALCo from the early 1900s, when the Pennsy's steam-locomotive purchases from ALCo were minimal, to 1968 when the Pennsy purchased the last of its 495 ALCo diesels. As the title indicates, this volume covers the Pennsy's ALCo RS series diesel locomotives. It presents rosters listing the road number, PRR class, shipping date, builder's number, order number, options, 8/1/57 assignment, 9/1/60 assignment, 2nd road number, date renovated, new class designation, and notes on each ALCo diesel locomotive owned by the PRR.  Twenty-seven RS-1, six RS-2, one-hundred-fifteen RS-3, thirty-eight RS-11, six RSD-5, five RSD-7, twenty-five RSD-12, and six RSD-15 locomotives are listed in the rosters. Specifications are presented for each locomotive type and brief text outlines the Pennsy's ALCo purchases of each locomotive model as well as its purchases from other locomotive builders. Hahn states that the roster and specification information presented in this book was taken from official PRR and ALCo documents.  A selection of captioned black-and-white photographs (approximately 120 in all) is included for each locomotive type.  An index of photographs by locomotive road numbers is included at the end of this paperback. (56 pages, book)
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  54. Harwood, Herbert H., Jr. (1978). The 50 best of PRR: book three, a portfolio of the favorite fifty photographs from the fabulous collection and lens of the famous photographer, historian, author and editor. Baltimore, MD: Barnard, Roberts & Co.
    Due to his interest in railroad history, Harwood has amassed a large collection of negatives from other photographers in addition to his own work.  This volume presents 51 of his favorite black-and-white photographs of the Pennsy, including some of his own work and the work of many other photographers from his collection.  The photographs are presented in an eight-by-ten-inch format.  See also: Davis (1977) and Lorenz (1979).  (51 pages, book)
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  55. Haupt, Herman. (1853). General theory of bridge construction: containing demonstrations of the principles of the art and their application to practice. New York: D. Appleton & Company.
    Haupt’s engineering treatise on the construction of bridges was published during the year he became chief engineer of the PRR, although he began examining existing structures and experimenting with models and methods in 1840 when he was a civil engineer for the State of Pennsylvania.  In the preface to part one of the book, Haupt advised that he had been unable to find any published works that expounded on the means of calculating the strains upon timbers of bridge trusses or methods of determining the sizes and designs of framed trusses.  Therefore, Haupt devised most of the principles and methods himself.  Although the book focuses on general principles related to bridge construction, many details are presented including numerous formula, drawings and diagrams.  Part two of the book was written a “considerable time” after part one, and it covers many improvements that had been introduced.  Haupt used detailed descriptions of several Pennsylvania Railroad bridges and a few bridges of other roads to inform the reader of the then current state of bridge construction science.  He also furnished cost estimates based upon the prices that the PRR experienced.  Some of the bridges described in part two include, Pennsylvania Railroad Viaduct, Cove-Run Viaduct, Little Juniata Bridge, Sherman’s Creek Bridge, Cumberland Valley Railroad Bridge, Trenton Bridge, Bridge Across the Susquehanna, and others.  This book is widely available in libraries on microfiche as part of the Library of American Civilization, produced by Library Resources, Inc in 1970.  See also: Haupt (1981).  (268 pages, book, obtained from Northern State University Library)
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  56. Haupt, Herman. (1901). Reminiscences of General Herman Haupt; giving hitherto unpublished official orders, personal narratives of important military operations, and interviews with President Lincoln, Secretary Stanton, General-In-Chief Halleck, and with Generals McDowell, McClellan, Meade, Hancock, Burnside, and others in command of the armies in the field, and his impression of these men. Milwaukee: Wright & Joys.
    This is a limited autograph edition.  See the entry for the reprint edition below for a description.)
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  57. Haupt, Herman. (1981). Reminiscences of General Herman Haupt. NY: Arno Press.
    This Arno Press edition is a reprint of the 1901 limited autograph edition published by Wright & Joys Co.  The 1981 edition was reprinted from an original copy held by the University of Michigan Library.  The original title page lists Herman Haupt’s credentials as follows: Director , Chief Engineer and General Superintendent of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Contractor and Chief Engineer for the Hoosac Tunnel, Chief of the Bureau of United States Military Railroads in the Civil War, Chief Engineer of  the Tidewater Pipeline, General Manager of the Richmond & Danville and Northern Pacific Railroads, President of American Air Power Company, etc., etc.  It also states that the book gives “Hitherto Unpublished Official Orders, Personal Narratives of Important Military Operations, and Interviews with President Lincoln, Secretary Stanton, General-In-Chief Halleck, … and others in Command of the Armies in the Field, and His Impressions of these Men.”  As this description emphasizes, the book presents very interesting information about Haupt’s Civil War experiences.  However, the book also contains “A Personal Sketch of General Herman Haupt” written by Frank Abial Flower, which presents an overview of the life of this remarkable man who played an important role in the early development of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  Haupt (1817-1905) was a civil engineer who became an expert in bridge construction and a respected railroad manager.  In 1847 he was appointed assistant engineer for the Pennsylvania Railroad.  John Edgar Thomson was so impressed by his knowledge of bridge construction and his work on the relocation of the Juniata Division line that he appointed Haupt as his assistant and sent Haupt to examine the financial accounts, organization, machinery, and operating methods of the principal railroads in New England.  Haupt’s resulting plan of organization and management for the PRR was adopted without change and he was appointed Superintendent of Transportation in 1849, General Superintendent in 1850, and chief engineer from 1853 to 1855.  One of Haupt’s most notable PRR achievements was to convince the Board of Directors to develop local business, especially in coal, lumber, iron, and agricultural products by reducing rates during periods of reduced freight hauling.  He also worked in opposition to the state’s policy of taxing railroad traffic to sustain public canals.  In addition, he worked to unify and classify freight rates with the managers of other railroads.  See also: Haupt (1853).  (331 pages, book, obtained from the University of Minnesota Libraries)
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  58. Hill, Howard G. (Colonel). (1972). Riding the Limiteds' Locomotives. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company.
    This is an interesting and enjoyable book from a man who spent countless hours in the cabs of steam locomotives. Although he was not an engineman, he worked as a troubleshooter and lubrication expert on steam engines all over the world. This book focuses on two 1931 trips from New York to Chicago in the locomotive cabs of the Broadway Limited (Pennsylvania Railroad) and the Twentieth Century Limited (New York Central Railroad). He made the 20-hour, 908-mile Broadway Limited trip in the cabs of five K4s Pacific 4-6-2 locomotives (3:00 pm EST, February 5th - 10:00 am CST, February 6th). He made the 20-hour Twentieth Century Limited trip in the cabs of Class J-1 Hudson, 4-6-4 locomotives (2:45 pm EST, February 17th - 9:32 am CST, February 18th). Hill provides a fairly detailed description of his experiences in the engine cabs during each trip, and he also briefly compares the performance of the two locomotive types. He provides mileage and elevation charts for these journeys. Tabular logs of locomotive performance for these two trip are are included at the end of the book. In addition to these interesting journeys, Hill also provides a few pages about other recorded trips on locomotives and chapters on the development of steam passenger motive power on the Pennsylvania Railroad and the New York Central Railroad. The book also includes a paper, "The Influence of the Locomotive Upon the Unity of Our Country" by Clement R. Brown. Approximately 100 B&W photographs, mostly of steam locomotives, are included and much additional data are provided about Pacific type and Class J Hudson type locomotives in the appendix pages. (175 pages, book, obtained for the South Dakota State University Library)
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  59. Hirsimaki, Eric. (1997). Black gold – black diamonds: the Pennsylvania Railroad and dieselization, volume 1. Olmsted, OH: Mileposts Publishing.
    Hirsimaki’s excellent book about the transition of the Pennsylvania Railroad from steam power to diesel power reveals the use of significant source materials including PRR and Electro-Motive Division of General Motors (EMD) records.  The book begins in 1915 and discusses steam, electric, and turbine locomotive development in order to provide a context for the dieselization process.  The Pennsy was committed to steam power, not only because of its huge steam locomotive fleet, but also because it was loyal to the coal industry, which generated a large portion of the company’s revenues.  In addition, the PRR was promoting electrification in the 1930s when EMD was promoting dieselization as a major locomotive builder.  In the foreward, Hirsimaki states the book focuses on the story of the attitudes and actions of the PRR and EMD during the ten-year period beginning in the late 1930s.  Chapter one, A Standard Tradition, begins with the control of railroads by the U.S. Railroad Administration from 1917 through April 1920 when locomotives were rationed.  The Pennsy’s need for many more powerful locomotives to handle heavy ore and coal trains after WW1 is discussed.  Its steam locomotive roster had shrunk to 7,366 of which 3,500 were considered inferior at the time.  The chapter focuses on the company’s development and acquisition of steam locomotives through 1929.  Between 1925 and 1930 steam locomotive development made great progress.  Although the Pennsy adopted some new ideas, it ignored much of that progress and continued to refine existing technology.  Chapter two, Depression Doings, discusses the storage of thousands of PRR steam locomotives because of traffic declines during the depression and the electrification of the New York – Washington main line.  The company’s roster shrunk to 4,779 steam locomotives, and only 2,931 were in service.  The electrification project and the development of the P5, GG1, and other locomotives are discussed.  Also the emerging importance of the Electro-Motive Company, Electro-Motive Division, after it was acquired by General Motors and the development of the diesel-electric locomotive are discussed.  The Pennsy continued to build new steam locomotives such as the S1, and it experimented with the ill-fated steam-turbine-electric locomotive.  It’s continued resistance to diesel-electrics is partially attributed to a shortage of cash due to electrification and a surplus of steam locomotives in storage.  Chapter three, Something Borrowed, Something New, reports that the Pennsy ordered two 2,000 hp. E6A passenger units from EMC, but the War Production Board refused to authorize their construction in 1942.  Although the PRR ordered nine Baldwin diesel-electric 660 hp. yard switchers and a 600 hp. SW1 from EMD in 1942, the company was still emphasizing coal-burning locomotives.  In May 1942 Baldwin’s T1 and Altoona Works’ Q1 locomotives entered service.  Neither of these was able to meet the company’s needs and other non-diesel alternatives were pursued including pulverized coal-fired steam turbine electric locomotives.  Finally, in March 1944, the PRR realized that its steam locomotive development program was not adequate, and President Clement negotiated an order for two E7 cab units from EMD.  Chapter four, Changing Horses, covers the conclusion of PRR steam development, and the book ends in 1947 at the beginning of the PRR’s diesel acquisitions.  This book is very informative and interesting.  It includes more then 200 black-and-white photographs (many previously unpublished), and many charts, graphics, and tables. I concur with Robert McGonigal’s observation in a July 1998 review in Trains Magazine that the book contains numerous typographical errors.  However the content is well worth overlooking those errors.  (176 pages, book)
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  60. Howell, Cecil G. (1995). The building of the Pan Handle Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Unknown: Author.
    In the introduction to this book Cecil Howell states that he retired in 1991 with forty-four years of service on the Pan Handle Division.  His grandfather, born in 1858, worked on the Pan Handle Railroad and retired with fifty-eight years of service.  His father, born in 1890, became a telegraph operator at the age of eighteen and later retired with fifty years of service.  Mr. Howell’s self-published tribute to the Pan Handle Division continues his family’s 150-year relationship to the railroad.  The book provides a brief outline of the history of each of the railroads that were part of the Pan Handle Division.  In addition, much miscellaneous information is included, such as time schedules, photographs and articles taken from newspapers, photographs from other sources including post cards and private collections, Pennsylvania Railroad employee passes, baggage permits, employee recognition cards and certificates, and tickets.  Also included are pay stub messages, short pieces submitted by other individuals, a list of Pan Handle Division joint facilities, excerpts of the Rules of the Pennsylvania Lines West of Pittsburgh (1901), and more.  The book presents an interesting though disorganized, undocumented, and unappealing collection of information about the Pan Handle Division.  The photographs and other illustrations and inserts are extremely poor in quality in the photocopied, spiral-bound, copy that I examined.  However those who have enough interest in the Pan Handle Division to carefully read Howell’s work should be able to find something of interest.  See also: Koehler & Gayvert (1983).  (207 pages, book, obtained from Miami University Libraries)
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  61. Jacobs, Timothy. (1988). The history of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Greenwich, CT: Bonanza Books.
    Jacobs is widely published as a poet.  However he was born in Duboistown, PA, and his grandfather worked as a brakeman and then as an electrician for the PRR for over 40 years.  Therefore Jacobs has a long-standing interest in the Pennsy.  This book presents a brief history of the mighty PRR.  It's an attractively done work, illustrated with numerous photographs and a few drawings and maps.  The text is well written and presents the highlights of the Pennsy's 121-year lifespan.  (128 pages, book)
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  62. Jacobs, Timothy. (1994, c1988). The history of the Pennsylvania Railroad. NY: Smithmark.
    (This is a 1994 reprint of the 1988 Bananza Books publication.)

  63. Johnson, Willis Fletcher. (1889). History of the Johnstown flood: including all the fearful record; the breaking of the South Fork Dam; the sweeping out of the Conemaugh Valley; the overthrow of Johnstown; the massing of the wreck at the Railroad bridge; escapes, rescues, searches for survivors and the dead; relief organizations, stupendous charities, etc., etc.: with full accounts also of the destruction of the Susquehanna and Juniata Rivers, and the Bald Eagle Creek. Philadelphia: Edgewood Publishing Co.
    This classic book on the Johnstown flood is an incredible read.  Although the main subject is not the Pennsylvania Railroad, the railroad played an important role in the Johnstown area and it suffered great losses, of equipment, property, and lives during the tragic flood on May 31, 1889.  More than 2,200 people were killed in Johnstown by the flood.  Johnson’s book describes the events of the day and the resulting devastation of the Conemaugh River valley after the South Fork Dam burst and the waters of the Conemaugh Lake Reservoir were unleashed into the narrow valley.  Johnstown was a very industrialized area and one of the busiest railroad freight towns in the state.  The Pennsylvania Railroad tracks paralleled the Conemaugh River and Johnstown was one of the main freight stations on the line.  In addition the PRR had recently built a large brick station in Johnstown and employed a few hundred men in repair shops there.  The PRR had previously owned the lake and dam, and in 1881 a PRR engineer had pronounced the structure “perfectly safe.”  The people of Johnstown were warned by South Fork freight agent Dechert “…for God’s sake to take to the hills.”  However little attention was paid to the warning until it was too late.  Many eyewitness accounts are included in the book, which adds to its emotional charge.  In one account, William Henry Smith, a passenger on a PRR train that was in Johnstown when the 30-foot wall of water struck, said, “No words can adequately describe the terror that filled every breast, or the awful power manifested by the flood. … There was an ominous crash, and the round-house and locomotives disappeared.  … A hundred houses were swept away in minutes.  The locomotive of one of the trains was struck by a house and demolished. … The rear car of the mail train swung around … and turned over on its side.  Three men were observed standing upon it as it floated.  … As it would roll the men would shift their position.  The situation was desperate, and they were given up as lost.”  Another passenger on a train in Johnstown told Pemberton Smith, a PRR civil engineer, “I put down my book and stepped out quickly to the rear platform, and was horrified at the sight that met my gaze up the valley.  … There was a great wall of water roaring and grinding swiftly along, so thickly studded with the trees from along the mountain sides that it looked like a gigantic avalanche of trees.  … But in that instant I saw an engine lifted bodily off the track and thrown over backward into the whirlpool, where it disappeared …”   H.M. Bennett and S.W. Keltz, engineer and conductor, tell an exciting story of their escape on a locomotive ahead of the advancing flood before they jumped and ran for their lives up a hillside.  Johnson also covers the aftermath of the flood and the relief and cleanup efforts that were undertaken.  Of course the Pennsylvania Railroad was very active in those community efforts as well as recovering and replacing its own physical plant and healing employee morale.  Within days the PRR Board of Directors had approved a donation of $25,000 for the assistance of flood survivors, and individual PRR employees contributed additional funds.  At the end of the book Johnson also includes three chapters about devastation from the same storms in other locations, including Williamsport and the Juniata Valley (Tyrone, Huntingdon, Lewistown) in PA, and Washington, D.C.  A few photographs and a very helpful map of the Conemaugh River Valley are included.  This is an informative yet exciting book that reads almost like a novel.  (459 pages, book, obtained from Augustana College (SD) Library)
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  64. Jonnes, Jill. (2007). Conquering Gotham : a Gilded Age epic: the construction of Penn Station and its tunnels. NY: Viking.
    (Not yet annotated. Click here for information about the book from WorldCat.)

  65. Kobus, Ken, & Consoli, Jack. (1997). The Pennsy in the steel city: 150 years of the Pennsylvania Railroad in Pittsburgh. Kutztown, PA: Pittsburgh Chapter, Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society.
    This is a book was published to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the incorporation of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  It was published in conjunction with the Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society's 1996 Annual meeting, which was held in New Kensington, Pa., and hosted by the Pittsburgh Chapter.  The authors present on overview of the history and facilities of the Pennsylvania Railroad in Pittsburgh and the heavily industrialized surrounding area.  Brief text describes the PRR's growth and development in Pittsburgh.  The main line east of Pittsburgh is characterized with well-captioned photographs.  Each of the various lines associated with the PRR in the Pittsburgh area are discussed briefly, including: Pittsburgh, Ft. Wayne & Chicago Railway; Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad; Pittsburgh, Virginia & Charleston Railway; Western Pennsylvania Railroad; and Allegheny Valley Railway.  Although the text is very brief, it is the copious black-and-white photographs (240 of them) and their informative captions that make this book a terrific read.  Photographs of prominent stations, signal towers, enginehouses, yards, bridges, and tunnels, as well as locomotives at work, depict the extensive PRR physical plant in the area.  Associated city scenes and surrounding areas are also shown in the photographs.  In addition, the publication includes some very useful maps including a 25x38-inch supplement sheet of maps and diagrams.  See also the authors' The Pennsylvania Railroad's Golden Triangle: Main Line Panorama in the Pittsburgh Area below and Feibelman (1979).  (88 pages, book)
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  66. Kobus, Ken & Consoli, Jack. (1998). The Pennsylvania Railroad's golden triangle: main line panorama in the Pittsburgh area. Upper Darby, PA: Pennsylvania Railroad Technical and Historical Society.
    Kobus and Consoli present their second installment covering the history and facilities of the Pennsylvania Railroad in the Pittsburgh area.  Their first installment (see The Pennsy in the Steel City above) presented an overview of all PRR lines into Pittsburgh along with a detailed history of each line.  This book describes the three main PRR lines that converged at Pittsburgh.  PRR Main Line was put into service in 1854, and the company undertook a strategy of acquisition, leasing and stock ownership to combine a multitude of small western railroads to expand into the Midwest.  The collection of lines forming the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway Company (commonly known as the Fort Wayne) was consolidated in 1861.  Several small railroads were merged into the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis (commonly known as the Panhandle) in 1916.  This book offers a black-and-white photographic look at the three converging PRR lines in the Pittsburgh area with a detailed view of some of the larger facilities.  The book is organized into three chapters covering each of the main lines with 27 pages devoted to the PRR main line east, 20 pages devoted to the Panhandle, and 39 pages devoted to the Fort Wayne.  The substantive information in this book is presented through the photographs and informative captions, which are presented sequentially beginning in downtown Pittsburgh.  This book presents some truly remarkable photographs of major PRR facilities.  Eighteen photos of Pitcairn Yard are included in 8 pages. As would be expected in Pittsburgh, numerous views of bridges and bridges under construction are shown.  About fifteen photos of the Federal Street Station area are included with several taken during of the construction of the station. The importance of the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway's Allegheny Shops is recognized with nineteen photographs and two track and building maps (1893 and 1906).  Of course the Conway Yard is recognized with 15 pages containing 45 photos.  The book begins with a 1948 map of the Pittsburgh area railroads.  See also: Feibelman (1979).  (91 pages, book)
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  67. Koehler, Larry L. & Gayvert, Morgan J. (1983). Three feet on the panhandle: a history of the Waynesburg and Washington Railroad. Canton, OH: Railhead Publications.
    Koehler and Gayvert present a detailed history of the little-known Waynesburg and Washington Railroad.  The short (28-mile), narrow gauge, branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad connected Waynesburg, the county seat of Green County, and Washington, the county seat of Washington County, in southwestern Pennsylvania southwest of Pittsburgh.  The W.&W. was formed in 1875 and opened operations in 1877 as an independent company.  However it was sold to the PRR in 1885 and leased to another PRR road, the Chartiers Valley Railroad.  It managed to maintain its corporate identity until 1920 when the Pennsy forced it to paint and reletter it rolling stock as a branch line.  All passenger service on the line ended in 1929 and steam locomotives vanished in 1933.  However the I.C.C. did not permit the elimination of service on the W. & W.  Some freight service was continued until 1976 using a assortment of unusual equipment including a trackcar until 1940 and a gasoline powered 1940 Ford truck that was converted to a railtruck until 1958.  The line was regauged in 1943/44.  Truck service using the roads that paralleled the track was maintained by the PRR (and later by the Penn Central) from 1958 until the reorganization in 1976.  In 1978 Penn Central sold the rails and ties to a scrap dealer.  The authors reprint many documents in this fascinating book including the Articles of Association of the Waynesburg and Washington Railroad Company, excerpts from W.&W. annual reports, letters, and an entry on the W.&W. published in Poor’s Manual in 1900 that provides data on the railroad for the year ending December 31, 1899.  The construction, development, expansion, and decline of the railroad are covered as well as chapters on motive power, equipment and operations, right-of-way and structures.  Many photographs, diagrams of motive power and rolling stock, and statistical data are provided.  A short history of related area railroads by Edward C. boss is also included and an index appears at the end.  See also: Howell (1995).  (208 pages, book, obtained from the North Carolina State University Library)
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  68. Kramer, Frederick A. (1978). Long Island Rail Road. Newton, NJ: Carstens Publications, Inc.
    Kramer presents the story of the Long Island Rail Road in brief text, photographs, and informative captions.  The Long Island’s 131-year, 8-month, 28-day life was unique in railroad history.  The western third of its domain covered Brooklyn, Queens, and Nassau County where the Long Island was “America’s most efficient people hauler for decades” carrying a quarter of a million commuters daily.  The eastern two-thirds had little in common with the commuter operations that dominated the Long Island’s activities.  Freight service was incidental on the Long Island.  It was the only class I railroad in the U.S. that generated less revenue from freight than from passengers.  The Long Island Rail Road was chartered in 1834 with the intent to develop rail service from Brooklyn through the length of Long Island to Greenport.  There, passengers and freight would cross the Sound by steamboat and then continue by rail to Boston.  This New York to Boston route was accomplished by 1844.  Unfortunately a competitor completed an all-rail route on the mainland in 1848.  Difficult times began for the Long Island partially because they had neglected development of local service in favor of the shortest route through uninhabited areas.  A merger with the Flushing & North Side Railroad in 1876 provided little help and the railroad’s struggle continued.  In 1881 Austin Corbin took charge of the Long Island and substantially increased business, including branch line extensions, and property modernizations during his sixteen-year term.  The Pennsylvania Railroad acquired the Long Island in 1900, two years after Corbin’s death.  The Long Island’s holdings gave the Pennsy a better entry into New York, and a joint use of the proposed Penn Station would increase its traffic and importance.  PRR investment in the Long Island resulted in electrification of the LI’s western portion between 1904 and 1906.  It also made the Long Island the first railroad in the country to use steel cars exclusively and brought its commuter trains to Penn Station in 1910, two months before the Pennsy’s trains.  The Long Island was finally able to pay dividends to the Pennsy in 1928, but they only continued until 1933.  Regulation of commuter fares and the development of the highway system helped make the Long Island unprofitable.  In 1949 the Pennsylvania put the Long Island in bankruptcy.  Legislation and a $5.5 million loan from the Pennsy enabled the Long Island to emerge as a redevelopment corporation for several years, but in 1966 it became part of the Metropolitan Commuter Transportation Authority.  Most of Kramer’s book presents black-and-white photographs taken by John Krause, which focus on the steam-to-diesel transition that occurred in the area east of Jamaica.  Approximately 135 photographs are included.  He also provides a locomotive roster at the end of the book.  See also: Ziel (1984).  (96 pages, book, obtained from the Kern County Library, Bakersfield, CA)
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  69. Kramer, Frederick A. (1980). Pennsylvania – Reading Seashore Lines. Ambler, PA: Crusader Press.
    Kramer provides a brief look at the history of the PRSL.  He begins by outlining the development of the Jersey shore as a “playground” for the citizens of Philadelphia and other nearby cities.  Dr. Jonathan Pitney’s plan to build a healthy vacation spot needed a railroad to provide an acceptable way for vacationers to reach the shore.  In 1854 the Camden & Atlantic Railroad began regular daily service to what would become Atlantic City, about a three-hour trip.  After the Civil War, Atlantic City experienced a boom period and became famous for its Boardwalk (built in 1870 to reduce the amount of sand tracked into the hotels).  In 1877 the Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway began its narrow-gauge operations, and in 1880 the West Jersey & Atlantic, a branch of the West Jersey Railroad, connected Atlantic City to the West Jersey’s main line between Camden and Cape May.  The Pennsylvania Railroad had gained ownership of a majority of the stock of the West Jersey in 1875, and for many years the West Jersey’s president was George B. Roberts, the President of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  The competition between the three railroads in Atlantic City was fierce.  In 1883 the Pennsylvania bought out the Camden & Atlantic, and the Philadelphia & Atlantic City was taken over by the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, another powerful railroad at the time.  Kramer covers the further development and competition of the two major railroads.  The development of the New Jersey highway system and the popularity of automobiles and trucks in the 1920s provided another fierce competition for the railroads. This, along with the development of buses, devastated both the freight and passenger railroad service to the Jersey shore.  In 1929 the South Jersey Transit Commission was established by the State to develop a comprehensive scheme for rapid transit between Philadelphia and South Jersey.  This plan resulted in the forced consolidation and joint operation by the Pennsylvania and Reading Railroad.  Thus the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines began operation in 1933.  Kramer covers the expansion of the PRSL in the 1930s and 1940s and the subsequent decline in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s.  The PRSL annual loss was more than $4.5 million in 1968 and 1969.  The PRR had merged with the New York Central in 1962.  However the Penn Central declared bankruptcy in 1970 and the Reading declared bankruptcy in 1971.  PRSL losses exceeded $5 million per year in the early 1970s.  In 1976 the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines ceased to exist and became the Seashore District of Conrail’s Philadelphia division.  Kramer includes over 170 black-and-white photographs with informative captions and numerous illustrations including timetables, tickets, drawings, and maps.   A steam locomotive roster, diesel roster, and passenger equipment roster is also included.  See also: Gladulich (1986).  (104 pages, book obtained from the University of Montana Libraries)
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  70. Kusner, George S. & Seman, Nicholas. (1989). Pennsylvania Railroad compendium, volume number one, freight car lettering arrangements 1954 - 1968. New Cumberland, PA: The Middle Division.
    Kusner provides a selection of 110 technical illustrations of the original Pennsylvania Railroad freight car lettering arrangements issued from 1954 through 1968.  The illustrations are computer-recreated drawings or the original PRR tracings and are referenced to the railroad's tracing numbers.  He explains that the age and usually poor condition of the original tracings and prints required extensive restoration and redrafting.  These drawings provide a wealth of information for the historians and modelers.  They were created by the PRR to provide system-wide uniformity in the appearance of company cars.  Each drawing illustrates the exact size, position, color, and function of all makings used to identify the rolling stock. Both the shadow keystone and the plain keystone designs are covered, and several pages at the end show various styles for keystones and lettering.  A table of contents lists each tracing number, the car class of the illustration, the car classes covered by the tracing, the date of the original drawing, and the date the drawing was issued.  These drawings also provide detailed painting instructions.  The drawings in this book are large (10.5x15.5 inches), although they are one-half the size of the original PRR drawings. (115 pages plus 3 folded drawings in back pocket, book)
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  71. Lee, Warren F. (1987). Down along the old Bel-Del: the history of the Belvidere Delaware Railroad Company, a Pennsylvania Railroad Company. Albuquerque, NM: Bel-Del Enterprises.
    Lee was born in Phillipsburg, NJ near the Bel-Del depot at Union Square, and he became well acquainted with a large part of the Bel-Del main line and the river that the railroad paralleled.  After a long career as an administrator and professor of history, mostly at the University of Albuquerque, he began a project to produce a detailed history of the Belvidere Delaware Railroad Company, which was a vital part of the Pennsylvania Railroad System.  The project was sponsored by the Tri-State Railway Historical Society, Clifton, NJ.  Four years of research were undertaken to uncover as much information as possible about the origin, operation, and disposition of the Bel-Del and produce this book.  The Bel-Del, mostly built between 1850 and 1855, was an important carrier of passengers and freight serving Trenton, Lambertville, Phillipsburg, and Belvidere in New Jersey during its century and a quarter of operation.  It also served several cities in Pennsylvania as an interstate carrier including Easton and Bangor in Northampton County, and using tracks of the Delaware, Lackawana, and Western Railroad, Stroudsburg and East Stroudsburg in Monroe County.  More than eighty percent of the railroad was located in New Jersey on the eastern bank of the Delaware River in a high-density traffic area, which enabled it to deliver and receive from principal PRR yards in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.  The Pennsylvania Railroad assumed control of the Bel-Del in April 1872 through a long-term lease of the line, which continued until 1958 when the Belvedere Delaware Railroad and several other lines were merged into the United New Jersey Railroad and Canal Company.  There are three major chapters in this book.   Chapter one, “Origin, Development, and Operation”, covers physical growth, development, and demise of the Bel-Del in 124 pages.  In addition to text, it presents information about individuals, motive power, important documents, industries, and businesses along the line, using many well-captioned photographs, maps, illustrations, tables, timetables, and advertisements.  Chapter two, “Over the Road” (129 pages), presents information about passenger service, depots, stations, and geographical locations.  It also includes many reproductions of timetables, maps, and photographs of stations, trackside scenes and structures.  Chapter three, “Catastrophes, Wrecks, and Adversities” (64 pages), addresses many wrecks including four major tragedies that occurred on the line and presents some very interesting photographs.  Each of these three chapters also includes documentation in an “End Notes” section.  The book finishes with a bibliography and index.  (366 pages, book, obtained from Oklahoma State University Library)
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  72. Lee, Warren F. & Lee, Catherine T. (1989). A Chronology of the Belvidere Delaware Railroad Company (a Pennsylvania Railroad Company) & the region through which it operated. Albuquerque, NM: Bel-Del Enterprises.
    Lee’s second book on the Belvidere Delaware uses the same source materials that were used for the 1987 book.  However, this chronology compliments the first book by presenting additional information and presenting the information in a totally different format.  The introduction states the chronology includes information from newspapers, company documents, letters and memoirs and presents the information essentially as it appeared in the original source, without the interpretation or analysis that was presented in the 1987 book.  Therefore the chronology provides raw data and the views of contemporaries, which could be used to verify and substantiate the accounts in the previous book.  In addition, data from the chronology could provide a substantial foundation for new research on the railroad or local histories regarding the areas the railroad affected.  Many of the entries, over 3300 items, in the chronology were taken from regional newspapers, which reveal a great interest in the railroad by the general public.  Although the focus of the chronology is the Belvidere Delaware, it also presents a record of events from the history of the communities along the line and an insight into the daily life of the railroaders and their families.  The entries are listed by the day and month of publication or date of occurrence under year headings beginning with 1654 and ending with 1985.  They are further organized into seven chapters including: The Era Prior to Construction Through 1850; The Independent Years, 1851-1871; Depression and Boom, 1872-1880; Many Good Years, A Few Poor Years, 1881-1900; The Zenith Years, 1900-1916; From War to War, 1917-1945; The Late Years, Demise and Beyond.  The length of the entries ranges from one to ten lines.  Also included are 125+ black-and-white photographs, several track and yard maps, timetables, several short essays, a few short documents, corrections and commentaries for the previous book, and an index.  (389 pages, book, obtained from Hunterdon County Library, Flemington, NJ)
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  73. Loeb, Betty Wagner. (1999). Altoona and the Pennsylvania Railroad: between a roar and a whimper. Altoona, PA: The Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society.
    Loeb presents a lovingly crafted story of the Pennsylvania Railroad’s relationship with the city it built as a base of operations on the eastern slopes of the Allegheny Mountains.  In 1849 the PRR purchased 224 acres of farmland at a cost of about $10,000.  A 35-acre tract was designated for the PRR shops, and the remainder was sold for town lots.  The PRR named its town Altoona, possibly from the Cherokee word Allatoona, meaning “high lands of great worth”.  Colonel Beverly Mayer, the civil engineer who laid out the tracks in the railroad yards, may also have bestowed the name after the city of Altona in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, which was an important railway center.  Altoona is 235 miles west of Philadelphia and 116 miles east of Pittsburgh.  It is situated where single locomotives needed additional power to scale the 2,300-foot Allegheny Mountains.  The PRR shops constructed, repaired, and maintained the motive power to conquer the mountains.  Incorporated as a borough on February 6, 1854, Altoona’s population rose to 10,610 by 1870.  Loeb’s story of Altoona and the PRR is told using short factual text segments and almost 200 unique and fascinating photographs.  Part I presents a brief history of the city’s birth. Part II presents the development of the city including city services, schools, hotels, libraries, ethnicity, neighborhoods, recreation,, etc.  Part III covers the PRR shops, which provided the city’s major employment until the company’s demise in the late 1960s.  Part IV discusses the dirty and difficult lives of the men and women who worked in the PRR shops as well as the labor unions, the Mutual Beneficial Association, the great depression, WWII, and more.  The famous Horseshoe Curve, located about five miles west of Altoona in covered in Part V.  The book also includes Altoona’s Last Trolley Day by John D. Denny, Jr., Altoona’s Towers and Interlockings by William Stassner, Altoona Geography is Destiny by Peter D. Barton, Executive Director of the Altoona Railroaders Memorial Museum, and excerpts from the PRR employment diary of W.C. Snyder, which presents highlights of his services in Altoona and Hollidaysburg from 1888 to 1914.  Also included are a regional PRR map and Altoona yard diagrams.  This book contains some truly remarkable photographs of the PRR shops and the men and women who toiled in them.  For those of us who grew up in PRR families in Altoona it is a treasure.  (99 pages, book)
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  74. Lorenz, Bob. (1979). The 50 best of PRR: book four, a portfolio of the favorite fifty photographs from railfandom's famous brush and lens artist. Baltimore, MD: Barnard, Roberts & Co.
    Bob Lorenz started photographing trains in the early forties and states that his PRR works are his favorites.  The fourth book in this photographic series presents 52 extraordinary black-and-white photographs of Pennsy scenes and equipment taken by Lorenz.  Charles S. Roberts wrote the captions for all the photos.  The images are presented in an eight-by-ten-inch format.  See also: Davis (1977) and Harwood (1978).  (52 pages, book)
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  75. Lost Masterpieces. (1999). London: Phaidon.
    This beautiful book is part of Phaidon’s Architecture 3s series, each of which reprints information on three structures that are similar in some way.  Lost Masterpieces covers three building that are “among the most significant works of the last two centuries, and yet none of them stands today.”  Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace was a temporary structure built for the Great Exhibition in London in 1851.  Ferdinand Dutert’s Palais des Machines was built for the Paris Exhibition of 1889.  McKim, Mead and White’s Pennsylvania Station was built from 1905-1910 in New York City.  In their introduction in Lost Masterpieces, Beth Dunlop and Denis Hector remind us that Pennsylvania Station was a temple of progress that served as the destination for America’s increasingly efficient railroad system.  They also remind us that McKim, Mead and White surely regarded the station as a permanent monument.  They contend that the demolition of such a monumental and imposing structure as Pennsylvania Station was unthinkable, and it remains a major symbol of the American Preservation Movement.  This book reprints in full Steven Parissien’s 1996 history and chronology of Pennsylvania Station and includes all photographs and drawings from that publication, which was part of Phaidon’s Architecture in Detail series.  See also: Parissien (1996). (unpaged, book, obtained from University of Minnesota Libraries, Twin Cities Campus)
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  76. Lovell, Joseph D. (1984). Pennsylvania Railroad Altoona Machine Shops construction number list, 1866-1904. [Philadelphia]: Library of American Transportation, National Railway Historical Society.
    No US railroad built as many of its own locomotives as did the PRR.  Between November 1866 and January 1904 the PRR's Altoona Machine Shops built 2,289 locomotives, a number only exceeded by the 4,584 built at the Juniata Shops between July 1891 and June 1946.  Lovell, a long-time employee of the PRR at Altoona, chronicled every locomotive built at AMS during its 38 years of existence.  He completed his compilation in 1939 and presented ten loose-leaf binders to a friend.  In 1953 the work was given to the PRR library.  Eventually the binders were acquired by the National Railway Historical Society whose editorial staff turned the pencil notebook pages into this book.  Locomotives are listed in order by construction number with the date of construction, class, road number, and remarks indicating such information as when the engine was demolished, or when it was sold to another railroad, or what modifications were applied and when.  Also included are sections containing an original road number to construction number cross-reference list and a later road number to construction number cross-reference list.  (113 pages, book, obtained from the State Historical Society of Wisconsin library)
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  77. McGonigal, Robert S. (1996). Heart of the Pennsylvania Railroad, the main line: Philadelphia to Pittsburgh. Waukesha, WI: Kalmbach Books.
    This is the fourth volume in Kalmbach’s Golden Years of Railroading series which take the reader trackside through the black-and-white photographs from the publisher’s photo archives.  The Golden Years of Railroading series depicts railroading from the end of world War II through the late 1950s when steam locomotive and new diesel locomotives worked side by side.  This book covers the Philadelphia to Pittsburgh route, which was made up of three divisions, i.e., The Philadelphia Division from Philadelphia to Harrisburg, the Middle Division from Harrisburg to Altoona, and the Pittsburgh Division from Altoona to Pittsburgh.  McGonigal, an associate editor of Trains Magazine, begins with a brief, five-page, history of the Pennsylvania Railroad and then presents three chapters covering the three divisions.  Each chapter contains a three-to-four page introduction and then describes Pennsy operations and equipment with numerous captioned photographs.  The author completes the book with a brief chapter that describes the changes that have occurred on the line during the Conrail and Amtrak years followed by an index of the photographs.  Many very interesting photographs are offered in this work.  However many of them were previously published in Trains Magazine or elsewhere, so many readers may not find much unique material here.  Also, the quality of some of the photographs is somewhat diminished by rather dark printing.  However McGonigal has constructed a worthwhile portfolio (120 photographs) that depicts this highly industrial and industrious main line during an interesting time period.  (127 pages, book)
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  78. Meader, Stephen W. (1944). The long trains roll. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company.
    This novel is based on the alleged Nazi plot to disrupt rail traffic on the Horseshoe Curve during World War II.  The story is set in the mountains of Pennsylvania east of Pittsburgh.  Real place names are not used, except Pittsburgh.  Instead, the “big curve”, “Calico Gap”, and “Gaptown” serve as the place names.  Pennsy is referred to only once in the book.  However it is quite evident the book’s setting is the Horseshoe Curve and Altoona area.  The story focuses on a seventeen-year-old young man named Randy MacDougal, who works as a “gandy dancer” on a section gang on the curve and surrounding vicinity and later as a fireman.  Randy’s father is a “hogger” or “hoghead” providing helper service over the gap to the heavy freights, and his sister works as a secretary in the Gaptown car shops.   Randy uncovers a plan to dynamite tons of rocks onto the curve tracks and other sabotage to hinder the movement of troops, and military supplies over the gap.  Railroad security and the FBI get involved and there is some excitement before Randy becomes a hero.  Aside from the sabotage storyline, the book presents an interesting description of the important, physically difficult, and dangerous work of section gang workers.  If the roadbeds and tracks were not maintained no trains would roll.  It also provides a very interesting look at the strategic role of railroads during World War II and the considerable efforts that were undertaken to maintain their security.  The book refers to unending traffic of “long strings of heavy flatcars, loaded with anti-aircraft guns, tanks and Army tractors-grotesque-shaped monsters under their tarpaulin covers” along with uncountable cars marked explosives and “passengers coaches, with disheveled boys in khaki crowed at every window”.  It also places military troops patrolling the mountains surrounding the railroad right of way and observation planes overhead.  “Wars are no longer fought merely by armies, navies and air forces.  The curse of human hate and suffering and bloodshed involves whole populations, reaches into homes and factories, tears at the foundations of all civilized life.  The effort on each side is to destroy the production and transportation that enable the enemy to keep on fighting.”  This is a very enjoyable read for anyone interested in the Pennsy or railroad history in general.  Edward Shenton illustrated the book.  (259 pages, book, obtained from University of Minnesota Libraries)
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  79. Messer, David W. (1999). Triumph II: Philadelphia to Harrisburg, 1828-1998. Baltimore: Barnard, Roberts and Co.
    This second book in the Triumph series is primarily concerned with the PRR between Philadelphia and Harrisburg, i.e., the Philadelphia Division, with some additional information on the Columbia, West Chester, Coatesville, New Holland, and Quarryville Branches.  Messer begins with a thirty-two-page chapter outlining the beginning of the Pennsylvania Railroad during the struggle to return Philadelphia to its former status as a major trade center and seaport.  Competition from the construction of the Erie Canal to the north and from the B&O to the south had usurped Philadelphia's prominence in favor of New York and Baltimore.  Messer begins with Colonel John Stevens' efforts to convince the business community and the state of Pennsylvania that a steam railroad between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh would be far superior to the system of canals that were in operation at the time.  Chapters 2 through 4 cover the development of the PRR mainline through Harrisburg and the Rockville Bridge, mostly through numerous photographs with informative captions and a few pages of text.  Chapters 5 and 6 cover the Trenton Cutoff, the Low-Grade Line and Enola Yard in the same manner.  Chapter 7 presents a profile of the contributions of John Edgar Thomson drawn from James A. Ward's J. Edgar Thomson: Master of the Pennsylvania.  Chapter 8, Triumph in Color, presents color photographs of the PRR and its successors, as was done in a similar chapter in Triumph I.  The last chapter briefly ponders the legacy of the PRR, and the conclusions from the Report of the Investigating Committee of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, originally presented to the stockholders in 1884, is published as an appendix.   A bibliography and index are included at the end of the book.  Interestingly, Charles Roberts, author of Triumph I and editor of the Triumph series, also inserted a three-page response to some of the criticisms of Triumph I.  Messer does not cover electrification in detail because a subsequent volume in the series will cover it.  Like Triumph I, this book makes its most significant contribution through its fabulous assemblage of captioned, mostly black-and-white, photographs (approximately 660) and illustrations.  See also: Roberts (1997).  (399 pages, book, obtained from Angelo State University Library)
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  80. Messer, David W. & Roberts, Charles S. (2000). Triumph III: Philadelphia terminal, 1838-2000. Baltimore: Barnard, Roberts and Co.
    Not yet annotated.

  81. Messer, David W. & Roberts, Charles S. (2001). Triumph IV: Harrisburg to Altoona, 1846-2001. Baltimore: Barnard, Roberts & Co.
    Not yet annotated.

  82. Messer, David W. & Roberts, Charles S. (2002). Triumph V: Philadelphia to New York, 1830-2002. Baltimore: Barnard, Roberts & Co.
    Not yet annotated.

  83. Middleton, William D. (1996). Manhattan gateway: New York's Pennsylvania Station. Waukesha, WI: Kalmbach Publishing.
    Middleton, a retired naval engineer and university administrator, has published hundreds of articles and photographs, and more than a dozen books on the history of railroading since 1949.  This book presents a first-rate history Pennsylvania Station and its associated engineering feats that significantly added to the grandeur and competitive edge of the mighty PRR.  He covers the early proposals for extending the PRR line into downtown Manhattan in the late 1800s, the glory years of the 1920s, and the sad demolition of the station in the 1960s.  Appropriately, he provides extensive coverage of the tunnel and electrification projects with many maps, diagrams, and photographs showing the work in progress.  In addition, he provides short biographical sketches of the men who played a leadership role in the 160 million-dollar project, including PRR President A.J. Cassatt, Vice President Samuel Rea, and engineers Charles Walker Raymond, Charles Mattathias Jacobs, Alfred Noble, and George Gibbs.  Middleton begins his history of the station in a chapter entitled "A Great Roman Palazzo".  He describes the unique, low, horizontal building, rising to only 60 feet above street level, except over the main waiting room where the roof soared to 153 feet, with the tracks located 40 to 60 feet below street level, as a "monumental bridge" over the railroad's tracks.  Many photographs and illustrations of the building and a short biographical sketch of architect Charles Follen McKim are included.  One of Middleton's most interesting contributions is his presentation of the importance, and notoriety, of Pennsylvania Station not only to the PRR, but also to the nation.  Obviously the economic benefit to the company and to country is well recognized.  However, Pennsylvania Station was a magnificent Manhattan gateway to the entire East Coast, as well as points south and west, for millions of people from its opening in 1910 until its destruction in the 1960s.  It was the setting of numerous historical events, was pictured in countless magazines, newsreels and movies, and was written about in many books, short stories, and popular songs.  Its demise, like the demise of its parent railroad, is still very painful to many people.  Middleton includes 165 photographs or illustrations, a bibliography, and an index.  See also: Condit (1980), Couper (1912), Parissien (1996), Westing (1978). (159 pages, book)
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  84. Moore, Peter. (2000). The destruction of Penn Station: photographs by Peter Moore. New York: Distributed Art Publishers.
    This books presents more than 100 black-and-white photographs taken by the late Peter Moore.  Better known for his photographs of avante-garde performances, Moore and his wife, Barbara, lived a few blocks from Pennsylvania Station. In the introduction, Barbara Moore, who edited the book, explains that the station became an important part of their daily lives.  In addition to serving as their gateway to the West Side, it housed a local sandwich shop and the Savarin coffee shop, which they visited often.  Like the avante-garde performances that he usually photographed, Peter Moore decided that he must record the last production of Penn Station, i.e., its destruction.  He contacted the public relations department for the railroad and was granted access to the demolition areas.  From 1963 to 1966 he made thirty photographic forays to the site.  However the resulting photographs were stored away and never shown prior to the publication of this book.  The photographs are grouped by year and presented only with dates, no captions.  They are both beautiful and sad because they show the magnificence and strength of the structure as well as document its destruction.   Moore’s attention to detail is evident in numerous exterior photographs the reveal how this structure and its destruction impacted the environment of the neighborhood.  His numerous interior shots provide closeup views of the demolition of the station’s magnificence.  His photos of commuters waiting for trains inside the station an people on the streets outside the station while the destruction was under way reveal how its destruction was part of the daily lives of those who used it.  They also portray the incongruity of a structure that was still providing service even while it was being dismantled.  Barbara Moore provided an introduction.  Eric P. Nash provided an essay about the station and some of Moore’s photographs of it.  Lorraine B. Diehl provided a short chronology of relevant events.  See also: Diehl (1985) & Parissien (1966). (128 pages, book, obtained from University of Minnesota Libraries)
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  85. Murray, Michael S.; Yanosey, Robert J.; & Sherwin, Wayne. (2001). Trackside on the PRR north of Washington, DC with Wayne Sherwin. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Robert Yanosey and Morning Sun Books’ Trackside series presents the amazing work of many railroad photographers who worked in many different locations from the 1940s through the mid-1970s.  In volume 20 of the series, Murray and Yanosey present the color photographic work of Wayne Sherwin who grew up in the Washington D.C. area and began working for the PRR as a brakeman in 1955 at the PRR’s Benning Yard north of Union Station.  In 1956 he became a fireman and worked all over the Chesapeake Region including York, Wilmington, Baltimore, and other locations until 1961.  This gave him many opportunities to enjoy his avocation of railroad photography, which he had begun in 1947 at the age of thirteen.  Like the other books in the Trackside series, this book presents many spectacular photographs of PRR locomotives, equipment, facilities and settings.  The photographs picture the PRR on the Washington D.C. to New York mainline and on the previous Northern Central route from Baltimore through Harrisburg.  Locations include Ivy City, Potomac Yard Benning Yard, Landover MD, Bowie MD, Newark DE, Wilmington, Philadelphia, Waverly Yard in Newark, Meadows Yard in Kearney NJ, Atlantic City NJ, York, Rockville Bridge, Northumberland, Williamsport, Enola Yard and others.  In addition, 18 pages (15% of the book and about 14% of the photographs) show locations west of Harrisburg, including Altoona, Horseshoe Curve, Columbus and a few other Ohio locations, and Chicago.  More than 220 remarkable photographs are included in this book.  About 26% picture steam locomotives, 21% picture diesel locomotives, and 22% depict electric locomotive.  Approximately 26% of the photographs depict PRR facilities and locations without any locomotives in view or with two or more types of locomotives in view, and 5% of the photos picture train wrecks/derailments.  Most of the photographs date from the early 1950s through the late 1960s with a few in the 1970s and early 1980s.  The editors also provide a brief biography of Mr. Sherwin, a brief overview of railroading history north of Washington D.C., and informative photograph captions.  In addition, interesting comments by Mr. Sherwin are included.  This is another excellent addition to the Trackside series.  (128 pages, book, obtained from the Library of Congress).
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  86. Nelson, Douglas M. & Hastings, Philip R. (2002). Philip R. Hastings: Portrait of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Los Angeles: Pine Tree Press.
    Nelson and Pine Tree Press have produced an extraordinary collection of 145 photographs by the late Philip R. Hastings.  These black-and-white photographs reveal Hastings exception talent of capturing panoramic views of working locomotives, which reveal the wayside and the structures and landscapes beyond.  In addition, Hastings photographs depict working railroaders attending to equipment and services, interior views of locomotives cabs and signal towers, and many structures that were part of the Pennsy's landscape.  Hastings' photographic legacy is exquisite and the reproductions in this book, printed in duotone black and white, are beautiful.  Nelson selected 145 very impressive photographs, taken between 1948 and 1957, from an archive of over 800 negatives of Hastings' Pennsy images held by the California State Railroad Museum Library.  Most of the negatives were unlabeled, but Nelson's knowledge of the PRR enabled him to create very informative captions with help from Hastings' notebooks and some of Hastings' photos that were previously published with captions in Trains magazine or books.  This book includes a forward by Kevin P. Keefe, Associate Publisher of Trains magazine discussing Hastings work for Trains and his relationship with David P. Morgan, longtime editor of Trains.  An introduction provides a brief discussion of Hastings work and a brief history of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  The book also contains an afterward by photographer Jim Shaughnessy about his longtime friendship with Hastings.  The photographs are organized in the following chapters and PRR maps are included: Enola Yard, Rockville Bridge, and Westward; Over The Alleghenies; Pittsburgh - The Golden Triangle; The Northern Region (Shamokin Branch, Elmira Branch, Renovo, etc.); Camden, New Jersey, and Odenton, Maryland. An appendix includes notes transcribed from Hastings' notebooks for his Pennsylvania Railroad trips.  (128 pages, book, obtained from the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County)
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  87. Orr, John W. (2001). Set up running: the life of a Pennsylvania engineman, 1904-1949. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Orr tells the story of his father’s long career as a locomotive engineer on the Williamsport Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad.   As a boy growing up in Ralston, PA the author developed a fascination for railroads fueled by his observation of railroad activity and his father’s railroading stories.  His special relationship with his father, Oscar P. Orr, enabled him to experience his father’s working life through those stories, conversations, and detailed discussions until O.P. died in 1954.  This oral history is one of the most remarkable books I have ever read.  It presents incredible details about the daily work routines and experiences of this long-time steam locomotive engineer.  It depicts a hard-working, skilled, engineman who was loyal to the Pennsy.  However it also reveals the hardships and difficult life styles that were required of enginemen during the first half of the 20th century.  It presents an abundance of detailed information about the operation and capabilities of the various steam locomotives that were used.  Oscar P. Orr was born on in 1883 near Bellefonte, PA.  He took his first job firing the stationary boilers at a steam heating plant in Bellefonte in 1902.  O.P. began his PRR career as a fireman on the Williamsport Division in 1904.  In 1909 O.P. was “set up running” as an engineer of a Class R H3 locomotive on a yard crew.  Over the next 40 years O.P. would operate almost every type of stream locomotive (and every run) that ran on the Williamsport Division.  His run assignments as an engineer included Williamsport Yards (1909-1910), Ralston to Tyrone (1910-1930), Southport to Altoona (1930-1931), Altoona to Wilkes-Barre (1931-1933), Altoona to Harrisburg (1933-1934), Lykons to Millersburg (1935-1936), Southport to Enola (1936-1937), Williamsport Yards (1937-1947), and Williamsport to Renovo (1947-1949).  He much preferred over-the-road runs where he could “let the horses have their head” and run better than 80 miles an hour on selected sections of track.  He clocked himself by timing mileposts at 93 miles an hour at times.  However those over-the-road runs often prevented O.P. from getting home each night, so he took yard assignments, which enabled him to spend more time at home with his family.  This book puts the reader in the cab where they can experience the complexity of these mighty steam locomotives, hear the conversations between the train crew, and witness the hardships and dangers that they endured.  It also reveals the relationships between the train crews, the dispatchers, and the administration.  It’s a thoroughly enjoyable and very informative read.  Included are a few maps, track diagrams, and photographs, a glossary of terms, and a short list of other books and videotapes.  (376 pages, book)
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  88. Parissien, Steven. (1996). Pennsylvania Station: McKim, Mead and White. London: Phaidon.
    This beautiful book is part of the publisher's Architecture in Detail series, which covers internationally renowned buildings such as Fallingwater, Oxford Museum, University of Pennsylvania Library, Grand Central Terminal, and many others.   Each sixty-page volume in the series is written and compiled by authoritative authors, and presents a history of the building, numerous small and large format photographs (all black-and-white in this volume), technical drawings and working details, and a bibliography and chronology of the building.  Parissien, Assistant Director of the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art in London, provides an excellent history and chronology of Pennsylvania Station, which has been described as the greatest railroad station in the world and one of the greatest building projects of the early twentieth century.  PRR President Alexander Cassatt commissioned Charles McKim of the architectural firm, McKim, Mead and White, to design the tunnels into central Manhattan and a large station and hotel.  In 1906 William Symmes Richardson was made a full partner in the firm and assumed responsibility for a large part of the design due to McKim's failing health.  The design combined Beaus-Arts neoclassicism with the latest steel-frame technology, and Parissien details both the exterior and interior of the architectural design and its influences.  He also discusses the use of the building from 1910-1960, the struggle to save the building, its demolition, and the site today.  The numerous large photographs and drawings provide an excellent characterization of this lost treasure. See also: Condit (1980), Couper (1912), Middleton (1996), Westing (1978). (60 pages, book)
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  89. Pennsylvania Railroad Technical and Historical Society. (2000). Lewistown and the Pennsylvania Railroad: from moccasins to steel wheels: a collection of essays. Altoona, PA: The Society.
    This collection of essays was originally intended to chronicle the efforts that transformed the old PRR station at Lewistown Junction into the archive for the Pennsylvania Railroad Technical and Historical Society.  However the end result is a much broader, and more useful, product that describes the settling of Mifflin County Pennsylvania, and the development of the transportation system in the area.  Of course the Pennsylvania Railroad played an important role in that transportation system and about 63% of the book is devoted to information about the PRR including the restoration of the Lewistown Junction Station.  The book includes the following chapters: * Lewistown – A Juniata River Community by Forest K. Fisher * History of Transportation in Mifflin County by the Lewistown Sentinel * The Juniata Canal by Albright G. “Zip” Zimmerman * The Lewistown & Reedsville Electric Railway Co. by Gordon P. Frederick * The Kishacoquillas Valley Railroad by John G. Hartzler * History of Standard Steel by Paul T. Fagley * Air Service in Mifflin County by Ben Anthony, Donald Smith and the Lewistown Sentinel * The Pennsylvania Railroad in Lewistown by J.D. Lynch, Jr. * The Towers and Interlockings That Controlled Train Movements in the Mifflin-Denholm-Lewistown Area of the PRR Middle Division by William E. Strassner and The PRR-Fax Group * The PRR Main Line Coal Wharf at Denholm by Peter M. Forbes * Hawstone Track Pans, pictorial * The PRR’s Sunbury & Lewistown Branch by Carstens Publications * The Milroy Branch, pictorial * Lewistown Yard, pictorial * PRR Lewistown Wreck Train, pictorial * Lewistown Junction Station, pictorial * Rebirth of Lewistown Junction Station by Peg Stanley.  Also included is a reprint of a short article about a train robbery that occurred in the Hawstone area of the Lewistown Narrows in August , 1909, and numerous tables, maps, illustrations, interlocking diagrams, yard track diagrams, and drawings.  More than 360 mostly-black-and-white, captioned, photographs are included.  This is a very effective blend of interesting photographs and informative text.  (161 pages, book)
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  90. Pennypacker, Bert; Cope, David H.; Ellis, William; & Watson, Frank. (2000). Trackside around Philadelphia, 1946-1969, with Dave Cope, Bill Ellis & Frank Watson. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Robert Yanosey and Morning Sun Books’ Trackside series presents the amazing work of many railroad photographers who worked in many different locations from the 1940s through the mid-1970s.  Volume, 16, presents the work of David H. Cope, William Ellis, and Frank L. Watson covering Philadelphia tracksides from 1946-1969.  This book presents more than 230 color photographs, many from an era when black and white photography was in vogue.  Bert Pennypacker provides information about the life and work of each photographer along with an overview of railroading in Philadelphia.  In addition, he adds lengthy and very informative captions for each photograph, which tells the reader about the settings, equipment, facilities, and dates of the photographs.  The book also includes reproductions of promotional materials, train timetables, and maps.   The Reading Company, the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Philadelphia trolleys are also covered in this book.  However, forty-eight pages are devoted to the Pennsylvania Railroad, which features almost 80 photos taken by David Cope, and twenty pages are devoted to the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines, which features about 25 photos by William Ellis.  These two sections include more than 135 photographs, i.e., slightly more than 57% of the total number of photos published in the book.  PRR steam equipment photos include E5s, E6s, L1s, K4s, D16 and D16sb, G5s, H8sb, H9s, B6sb, and others.  The electric equipment photos include plenty of GG1, B1 electric switcher, GP38, P5a, MP54 m.u., P5a boxcab, and others.  The excellent photographs with very informative and extremely interesting captions in this book will be enjoyed by anyone interested in railroading during the 1940s, 50s, and 60s.  It will be of particular interest to those of us who have lived in Philadelphia or have traveled by PRR to and from Philadelphia.  (128 pages, book, obtained from Phoenix Public Library)
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  91. Pennypacker, Bert & Staufer, Alvin F. (1984). The many faces of the Pennsy K-4. Hicksville, NJ: N.J. International, Inc.
    Pennypacker and Staufer team up again (See Staufer's Pennsy Power and Pennsy Power II) to provide a much more substantive look at the beloved Pennsy K4 Pacific steam locomotive than does Harry Albrecht in his 1967, thirty-nine page, pamphlet (Pennsylvania Railroad K-4s: Steam Locomotives of Yesteryear).  The Many Faces of the Pennsy K-4 (number 6 in the publisher's Classic Power series) includes fairly lengthy text, about 150 black-and-white photographs, and 20 color photographs covering the ancestry, development, and use of the Pennsy K-4 locomotives.  The first K-4 locomotive was designed and built at the Juniata Locomotive Shops in Altoona and tested at the Altoona Test Plant in 1914, and the locomotives were constructed between 1917 and 1928.  The Pennsy K-4 fleet reached its pinnacle of 425 in 1929, and in 1947 Pennsy K-4 locomotives still numbered 422 and were the prime main line steam passenger engines.  Only three K-4 locomotives had been scrapped.  Pennypacker and Staufer supply fascinating and informative text dispersed into numerous sections throughout this book that provide detailed information about the locomotives.  Included are sections entitled, "The Ideal Pacific-How the Legendary K4s Was Made", "Expansion Years-Growth of the K4s.", "The Performance Challenge-The K4s Enters a New Phase of Power and Speed", "Gadgetry Unlimited-The K4s Get a Touch of Super Power" and others.  The authors also provide their personal recollections of the classic K4s and a description of two dramatic crashes involving K4 locomotives and their trains (one in Pittsburgh and one near Altoona) which resulted in the scrapping of the first three K4s.  Included are photographs of K4 locomotives under construction, fold-out schematic drawings of K4 locomotives and their parts, a fold-out color graphic of a 1940 streamlined K4s, several tables showing technical specifications, and a complete K4 roster showing the road number, construction number, date of construction, builder, and date and type of dispensation for each K4 locomotive.  See also: Albrecht (1967) and Kramer (1992) under Miscellaneous.  (177 pages, book)
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  92. Plant, Jeremy F. (2004). Trackside on the PRR in central Pennsylvania. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Robert Yanosey and Morning Sun Books’ Trackside series presents the amazing work of many railroad photographers who worked in many different locations from the 1940s through the mid-1970s.  Most books in this series each feature the color photography of one or two photographers.  However, this volume 35 in the Trackside series, edited by Jeremy F. Plant, collects photographs from several different photographers taken from 1947 through 1968. . The color photographs of Arthur Angstadt, George Dimond, Emery Gulash, Lloyd Hall, Lawson Hill, Arch Kantner, Bruce Kantner, and James P. Shuman are included.  Mr. Plant selected more than 230 stunning color photographs that depict PRR equipment and settings from just west of Philadelphia in the east to the vicinity of the Horseshoe Curve in the west.   Diesel locomotives are pictured in approximately 58% of the photos.  Steam locomotives are shown in 32% and electric locomotives are seen in 10%.  The images were captured on main line hot spots such as Rockville Bridge, Enola Yard, and Banks Tower near Harrisburg and, my favorite locations, Altoona, Horseshoe Curve, Gallitzin, and Cresson in the Allegheny Mountains.  In addition to locations near the main line, this book includes many photographs covering major north/south branch lines and east/west arteries off them.  PRR action is shown at locations such as Millersburg, Sunbury, Shamokin, Mount Carmel, Pottsville, Wilkes-Barre, Williamsport, and Renovo.  It’s a very diverse collection of photographs covering PRR equipment at work in rural scenic areas as well as industrial settings.  Mr. Plant includes a brief, but informative, overview of the PRR’s operations in central Pennsylvania and informative photograph captions.  I enjoyed this book very much.  (128 pages, book, obtained from Library Of Congress)
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  93. Plant, Jeremy F. & Angstadt, Arthur. (2001). Trackside around Allentown, PA, 1947-1968 with Arthur Angstadt. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Robert Yanosey and Morning Sun Books’ Trackside series presents the amazing work of many railroad photographers who worked in many different locations from the 1940s through the mid-1970s.  Volume 24 of this series presents the color photography of Arthur Angstadt, a lifelong resident of the Allentown area.  Angstadt's photographs are fabulous and and this book contains some truly remarkable and beautiful images of this highly industrialized yet mountainous area.  Unfortunately the Pennsy was not a major player among the railroads in the Lehigh Valley.  Therefore all but a very small portion of this book is devoted to smaller eastern roads such as the Reading , the Central Railroad of Jew Jersey, the Lehigh Valley, the Lehigh & Hudson River, and the Lehigh & New England.  In addition to Allentown, the settings include Bethlehem, Easton, and the Pennsylvania Dutch area including Emmaus, Kutztown, and others.  The PRR's Belvidere & Delaware (the Bel-Del) branch reached Easton, PA and its sister city, Phillipsburg, NJ along the east bank of the Delaware River.  In Phillipsburg, NJ, two Pennsylvania Alco RS1 roadswitchers are pictured in 1959 and 1960, and a Baldwin roadswitcher is shown in 1956.  Also included are three photographs of the gas-electric tuscan "Doodlebug" (4653) during a 1957 fantrip between Phillipsburg and Trenton, NJ.  The book also includes brief biographical information about Author Angstadt, an outline of railroads serving the Allentown area, maps, and very informative photograph captions.  This book is another excellent addition to the trackside series and should be very enjoyable to anyone who enjoys railroad photography or railroad history.  (128 page, book, obtained from Muhlenberg College Library, Allentown, PA)
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  94. Plant, Jeremy F.; Caloroso, Bill; & Hall, Lloyd. (2003). Trackside Around Sayre-Towanda-Waverly with Lloyd Hall. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Robert Yanosey and Morning Sun Books’ Trackside series presents the amazing work of many railroad photographers who worked in many different locations from the 1940s through the mid-1970s.  Volume 27 of this series presents the color photography of Lloyd Hall, a lifelong resident of Towanda, PA, who earned a degree in chemical engineering from Pennsylvania State College (now University) and returned to Towanda to work for Sylvania Electric Products until his retirement in 1986.  He inherited his interest in railroads from his father who worked for the Susquehanna & New York Railroad as a station agent and then the Lehigh Valley as a telegrapher.  Hall's father and uncle passed their interest in photography to him and his color photography of the Towanda region dates back to 1948.  Hall's photography has not been widely published, but about 50% of the photographs in Bill Caloroso's Pennsylvania Railroad's Elmira Branch were taken by Hall.  Most of Hall's photography was done within a 30-mile radius of Towanda.  Of course, photographs of the Lehigh Valley Railroad cover about 79 pages of this book because the Lehigh Valley dominated the area with its large yard and shop complex at Sayre.  The Erie Railroad is covered on 15 pages.  The Lackawanna and the Erie-Lackawanna Railroads are covered on 16 pages, and the Delaware & Hudson are covered on two pages.  The Pennsylvania Railroad Elmira Branch is covered on 8 pages, which present a selection of photographs the were not previously published in the Caloroso book.  Sixty-six percent of the PRR photographs included here were taken in 1957.  Thirteen photographs picture steam locomotives, including H-9, I-1 Decapod, L-1 Mikado, and M-1 locomotives.  Four photographs present diesel locomotives, including F3, F7, GP7, and RS-11 locomotives.  Four picture both steam and diesel locomotives.  In addition, there is a photograph in the Lehigh Valley section of the book that shows some derailed Pennsylvania  Railroad boxcars being cleaned up after a wreck in February 1950 at Mehoopany, east of Towanda.  All the photographs in this book, which were taken in Pennsylvania, were taken in Bradford County around Towanda and Sayre and on the Elmira Branch south from the NY state line to Grover at the far southwestern corner of the county.  The book includes maps covering the lines of each of the railroads, introductions by both Plant and Caloroso, brief information about the geography and history of the region, brief biographical information about Lloyd Hall, introductions for each railroad, and informative and interesting photograph captions.  This is another fine addition to Morning Sun's Trackside series.  (128 pages, book, obtained from the New York State Library)
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  95. Plant, Jeremy F. & Shuman, James P. (2000). Trackside under Pennsy Wires with James P. Shuman. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Robert Yanosey and Morning Sun Books’ Trackside series presents the amazing work of many railroad photographers who worked in many different locations from the 1940s through the mid-1970s.  Volume 19 of this series presents the color photography of James P. Shuman, who grew up in the Lancaster, PA area.  After returning from military service in Saipan during WWII, Mr. Shuman began a long career with the Pennsylvania Railroad as a relief agent and damage prevention specialist working i many locations including the Trenton Cutoff, Downingtown, Coatesville, Christiana, Elizabethtown, Landisville, Middletown, Carlisle, Mechanicsburg, and others.  He also help found, and played several leadership roles in, the National Railway Historical Society.  This book features over 200 of Shuman's excellent photographs of PRR equipment under the wires along the electrified lines in the Pennsylvania Dutch country between Harrisburg and Philadelphia during the company's final years.  The photos capture  P5as, GG1s, and E44s during a time of decline for the company.  That decline is visible in many of the photos, but traces traces of the company's former greatness is visible as well.  Plant includes a brief biography of James P. Shuman, a brief history of the Pennsylvania Railroad in the eastern half of the state, and a brief essay on Pennsy motive power during the period.  Like the other books in the Trackside series, this book includes many remarkable photographs of motive power, bridges, and trackside locations.  All the the photographs are accompanied by informative captions.  This is a thoroughly enjoyable book for any PRR enthusiast, and indeed for anyone who likes railroad photography.  (128 pages, book, obtained form the Library of Congress)
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  96. Plant, Jeremy F. & Yanosey, Robert J. (1999). Pennsylvania: standard railroad of the world. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun books.
    Plant and Yanosey and their publisher have created a thoroughly enjoyable book that illustrates the greatness of the Pennsylvania Railroad even as it declined in the 1950s and 1960s.  Using over 200 color photographs selected from the work of 36 photographers and numerous color reproductions of PRR promotional materials along with informative captions and chapter introductions, they show how the Pennsy’s grandiose nature was still visible in the 1940s and early 1950s.  The obvious decline of the 1960s is also visible.  The book begins with a brief, but cogent, history of the PRR.  Next it examines some of the motive power that most typified the Pennsy, including chapters on K4, M1, I1, T1, GG1, P5, electric switchers, freight electrics, E44, centipedes, passenger sharks, freight sharks, transfer units, Baldwin switchers, E units, F units, Geeps, second generation diesels, and critters.  The book then presents a tour of the 10,000 mile system including mainlines and branchlines.  These chapters include: *New York City, *New York & Long Branch, *Diesels on the NY & LB, *Princeton, *Bel-Del-Line, *Rail Motor Cars, *Camden, *Pemberton Branch, *Baldwins on the Pemberton Branch, *Atlantic City, *Philadelphia Commuter Scenes, *Wilmington, *Demarva Line, *Washington, *Harrisburg, *Rockville Bridge, *Enola Yard, *Buffalo Line, *Canada, *Middle Division, *Horseshoe Curve, *F Units on the Mountain, *ALCOs on the Curve, *Atop the Mountain, *Conemaugh & Johnstown, *Pittsburgh, *The PRR in the Midwest, *Notre Dame Football Specials, *Western Terminals, *Pennsy People.  The “Volume 1” designation implies that future volumes are anticipated.  (128 pages, book, obtained from the St. Louis County Library)
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  97. Randall, W. David & Ross, William M. (1988). The Official Pullman – standard library, vol. 4 Pennsylvania Railroad. Godfrey, IL: Railway Production Classics.
    This volume of the Official Pullman – Standard Library covers the Pullman cars of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  It presents schematic drawings, including exterior side and overhead interior views, of PRR Pullman passenger cars on foldout 8.5 x 24 inch pages.  The side views are rendered in HO scale and include no measurements or labels.  The overhead interior drawings are rendered in O scale and include very detailed labeling, measurements and other information.  However the quality of the labeled drawings is so poor that it is very difficult to decipher the information.  Perhaps the most interesting feature of the book is the captioned black-and-white photographs of the exterior and numerous detailed interior views of master rooms, single and double bedrooms, drawing rooms, lounge areas, barber rooms, buffet lounge areas, bar lounge areas, secretaries’ rooms, toilet and sink rooms, porter’s stations, and other areas.  Also included is a 25-page “Mechanical Details” section that provides numerous photographs with lengthy captions of the construction and mechanics of the Pullman cars.  In addition to the construction photographs detailed photos and information about the trucks and the air conditioning and electrical systems used on Pullman cars is included.  An index by PRR Numbers and by car names is provided at the back of the book, and a few black-and-white PRR advertisements are reproduced.  Other volumes of The Official Pullman – Standard Library cover the Santa Fe (v. 1), the New York Central (v. 2), the Great Northern-Northern Pacific-SP & S (v. 3), Southern Pacific prewar cars (v. 5), Southern Pacific postwar cars (v. 6), Southeast railroads (v.7), Rock Island (v. 8), Chicago & North Western (v.9), and Northeast railroads (v.10).  (165 pages, book, obtained from Frostburg State University Library)
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  98. Rau, William H.; Van Horne, John C.; & Drelick, Eileen E. (2002). Traveling the Pennsylvania Railroad: the photographs of William H. Rau. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press in cooperation with the Library Company of Philadelphia. (Note: edited by John C. Van Horne with Eileen E. Drelick; essays by Kenneth Finkel, Mary Panzer, and John R. Stilgoe).
    This remarkable book presents a selection of 86 stunning photographs from the 463 plates comprising the William H. Rau Collection of Pennsylvania Railroad Photographs, which are held by the Library Company of Philadelphia.   Rau was a preeminent Philadelphia photographer in the 1890s who was commissioned by the Pennsylvania Railroad to “photographically” document the routes of the railroad.  Eventually Rau mounted 463 photographs, mostly large-format 18-by-22-inch albumen prints, in albums titled “Pennsylvania Rail Road Scenery.”  Most of the photographs were taken in 1891 and 1893.  Van Horne states in the book’s introduction, “Photography afforded to the railroad the means of introducing Americans to the beauty and vastness of their country, and to the advantages of travel by train…”  The PRR displayed many of the photographs at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, in its stations, hotel lobbies, departments stores, and published them in promotional publications.  These photographs present views of the PRR physical plant and equipment as well as the towns and scenery along the tracks.  The book presents the photographs in the following galleries: *Main Line from New York to Philadelphia; *Main Line from Philadelphia to Harrisburg; *Main Line from Harrisburg to Pittsburgh; *Schuylkill Division, Northern Central Railway, and Belvidere-Delaware Division. In the book’s introduction Van Horne provides background information on William H. Rau and his commission from the PRR, the technical aspects of Rau’s work for the PRR, and the history of the collection.  Essays by Kenneth Finkel, Mary Panzer, and John Stilgoe address the life and work of William H. Rau and information about railroad photography.  An inventory of the entire William H. Rau Collection and a bibliography of William H. Rau’s Writing, compiled by William S. Johnson, are also included in this book.  These photographs are vivid, picturesque, and beautiful in addition to being informative.  The cogent captions for each photograph help the reader to know exactly where and what they are viewing.  In a pamphlet entitled Railroad Photography (Philadelphia: William H. Rau, 1891-92) Rau wrote “ The photographs in the ‘Pennsylvania Railroad Scenery’ series constitute the most striking and beautiful views to be had on the lines of the Pennsylvania Railroad in this State, the subjects being specially selected because of their picturesqueness and interest.”  I totally agree.  Van Horne should be commended for his excellent work of selecting the photographs and producing this book.  (260 pages, book).
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  99. Rench, Walter Freeman. (1921). Roadway and track. New York: Simmons-Boardman Publishing Co.
    (See the 3rd edition below for description.)

  100. Rench, Walter Freeman. (1923). Roadway and track (2nd edition). New York: Simmons-Boardman Publishing Co.
    (See the 3rd edition) below for description.)

  101. Rench, Walter Freeman. (1946). Roadway and track (3rd edition). New York: Simmons-Boardman Publishing Co.
    Rench was a member of the American Railway Engineering Association and a former PRR supervisor with 25 years of PRR services in the engineering and maintenance departments.  This book presents a PRR review of technical information on the construction and maintenance of roadbed and track.  He includes chapters on right of way, drainage, vegetation for banks, economics of roadway machines, labor saving methods and devices, tools and their uses, track obstruction, machinery and equipment, rail repair and inspection, maintenance of yards and terminals, and more.  May photographs, charts, and diagrams are used.  (350 pages, book, examined at the Library of Congress)
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  102. Roberts, Charles S. (1997). Triumph I: Altoona to Pitcairn, 1846-1996. Baltimore: Barnard, Roberts and Co.
    Roberts, a journalist, comes from a B&O family and has previously written several publications about the B&O including Sand Patch/Clash of Titans, which details the competition between the B&O and the PRR in western Pennsylvania.  Triumph I is the first volume in a series that is planned to cover the history of the entire Pennsylvania Railroad.   In Triumph I, Roberts, with reader/researcher assistance from Gary E. Schlerf, attempts the monumental task of detailing the awesome history of what was perhaps the PRR's most storied division, the Pittsburgh Division.  The book begins with four relatively short chapters (totaling 48 pages) covering the economic, social and political issues contributing to the development and growth of the PRR.  Chapter one actually begins with the European settlement of eastern North America and the western migration that ensued.  Chapter four covers the Allegheny Portage Railroad.  Chapter five, “The East Slope - West Altoona to Gallitzin”, presents a ninety-nine-page look at the engineering feats, including the Horseshoe Curve, required to hoist the PRR over the Allegheny Mountains.  Chapter six, “The West Slope - Gallitzin to Johnstown”, presents information about the places, both man-made and nature-made, and the PRR installations on the western slope of the Alleghenies in eighty-nine pages.  Chapter seven and eight, “The Gaps - Johnstown to Torrance” and “Rip Rap - Torrance to Pitcairn” respectively, complete this detailed look at the Pittsburgh Division in eighty-seven pages.  Chapter nine presents a short 1945 "Study of Train Operations" outlining the movement of freight trains between Pitcairn and Altoona on April 6th of that year.  Next, Roberts presents a forty-nine-page "Color Journey" with color photographs, some from the 1950s and 1960s and many from the 1990s, of locations and installations along the Pittsburgh Division.  Roberts' journalistic, opinionated, anecdotal writing style along with his frequent comparisons to the B&O and the lack of source documentation in this work has been criticized.  In addition, numerous inaccuracies have been alleged especially in the photograph descriptions.  However the book is entertaining and its numerous (over 600) photographs, maps, track charts, and other illustrations, many of which were not widely available previously, make a significant contribution.  Robert S. McGonigal's review of this book published in Trains Magazine (February 1998) appropriately concludes, "As a comprehensive visual record of the Pittsburgh Division, this work is without peer."  (399 pages, book, obtained from Frostburg State University Library)
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  103. Roberts, Charles S. & Messer, David W. (2003). Triumph VI: Philadelphia, Columbia, Harrisburg to Baltimore and Washington, DC, 1827-2003. Baltimore: Barnard, Roberts and Co.
    Not yet annotated.

  104. Roberts, Charles S. & Messer, David W. (2004). Triumph VII: Harrisburg to the Lakes, Wilkes-Barre, Oil City and Red Bank, 1827-2004. Baltimore: Barnard, Roberts & Co.
    Not yet annotated.

  105. Roberts, Charles S. & Messer, David W. (2006). Triumph VIII: Pittsburgh. 1749-2006. Baltimore: Barnard, Roberts and Co.
    Not yet annotated.

  106. Rosenbaum, Joel, & Gall, Tom. (1988). The Broadway Limited. Piscataway, NJ: Railpace Company, Inc.
    Rosenbaum and Gallo present an attractive and interesting tribute to the Pennsy's, upscale, all-Pullman, passenger service between New York and Chicago.  They begin with the early history of PRR New York to Chicago sleeper service including the New York and Chicago Limited in 1881 and the Pennsylvania Limited in 1887, which some railroad historians refer to as the predecessor of the Broadway Limited.  Then they discuss the 1902 births of the Pennsylvania Special and the NYC's Twentieth Century Limited.  In 1912 the Pennsylvania Special name was changed to The Broad Way Limited and the rivalry with the Central's Limited lasted until the late 1950s.  The Broad Way "referred to the PRR's broad right of way over which the train traveled".  However the newspapers began spelling it Broadway and that name was soon adopted by the PRR.  The book presents an enjoyable history of the Broadway with informative text and numerous (over 140) black-and-white and color photographs and illustrations.  Promotional illustrations, timetables, maps, and drawings help provide a description of the Broadway both inside and out over the years.  See also: Welsh (1999). (96 pages, bibliography, book)
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  107. Rosenberger, Homer Tope. (1975). The Philadelphia and Erie Railroad: its place in American economic history. Potomac, MD: The Fox Hills Press.
    The Sunbury and Erie Railroad Company was authorized by the legislature of Pennsylvania in 1837 and surveying began in 1838, but construction was postponed until 1852.  The legislature changed the name of the company in 1861 to the Philadelphia and Erie Railroad Company.  This rail connection between Sunbury and the Erie Harbor was basically completed by 1864 and was expected to bring significant financial benefits to Pennsylvania and especially to Philadelphia.  However, several factors adversely affected the realization of those benefits and the growth and prosperity of the company.  One of those factors was the construction and rise of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company with its connection of Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and beyond.  In 1862 the Pennsylvania Railroad gained control of the Philadelphia and Erie through a 999-year lease and loaned the P and E the funds to complete the railroad.  This provided the Pennsylvania with an important feeder and enhancement to its Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Erie and Buffalo rail net.  The PRR later absorbed the Philadelphia and Erie in 1907 terminating the P and E's corporate existence.  Rosenberger focused in detail on the Philadelphia and Erie's political, organizational, and especially financial struggles.  He did not present a very benevolent portrait of the Pennsylvania Railroad when discussing its exploitative control of the P and E.  However, he acknowledged that the Pennsylvania's relationship with the P and E kept the P and E away from the Pennsylvania's competitors and helped the PRR gain a significant advantage in meeting transportation/trade needs in  Pennsylvania and beyond.  Rosenberger stated, "In brief, the Philadelphia and Erie Railroad was an important factor in the growth of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company into a powerful corporation."   The book includes 27 chapters and more than 100 illustrations.  Nine appendixes provide the following information: 1.The text of the 1937 act to incorporate the Sunbury and Erie Railroad; 2. A list of other acts of the Assembly of Pennsylvania related to the P and E; 3. P and E trackage in 1907; 4. Construction dates and track miles by road sections; 5. Elevations, distances, and grades on the Sunbury and Erie; 6. Volume of freight and average cost and earnings per ton mile on the P and E 1879-1906. 7. A list of bond issues including dates, interest rates, dollars authorized, and type of bonds; 8. P and E net earnings and capitalization 1865-1905 at 5-year intervals; 9. A list of the presidents of the P and E 1837-1907 - Note that Samuel Vaughan Merrick (previously the first president of the Pennsylvania) was P and E president, February 23, 1856 through December 1857. The book also contains a chronology of major P and E events, a lengthy bibliography, and a detailed subject index.  This book is extremely detailed and presents much valuable information to those who are willing to invest the time to digest it. (748 pages, book, obtained from the University of Missouri - St. Louis Libraries)
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  108. Schafer, Mike & Solomon, Brian. (1997). Pennsylvania Railroad. Qsceola, WI: Motorbooks International.
    This first book in the publisher’s Railroad Color History series provides a very interesting and cogent brief history of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  The authors acknowledge that their work in no way presents a comprehensive history of the PRR.  However the work does provide an historical overview of basic information about the railroad for the armchair historian or PRR enthusiast.  This attractive book includes numerous color photographs and informative text that convey to the reader the story of the once mighty Pennsy, from its beginnings in the mid-1800s through its glory years in the early 1900s to its twilight years in the 1950s and 1960s.  In addition the authors have provided three chapters covering the PRR's vast steam, electric, and diesel locomotive fleet.  The book ends with a few pages on "The PRR Today" which describe where PRR road beds, shops, and stations are still in use, as well as museums that focus on the PRR such as the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania at Strasburg and the Railroaders' Memorial Museum in Altoona.  An index is also included at the back, but no list of references is provided.  (128 pages, book)
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  109. Scherb, Jeff. (2002). Trackside on the Pennsylvania: Standard Plans of the Standard Railroad of the World - Structures, Bridges, Signals and Signs. Aurora, CO: Highlands Station, Inc.
    Scherb presents scaled-down drawings of the standard small structures, bridges, signals and signs that would have been found trackside on the Pennsylvania Railroad.  While the drawings may be of interest to historians, model railroaders are likely to be the primary user of this volume.  The drawings were produced with Microsoft Visio 2002 and they are very detailed and accurately labeled, including measurements and sufficient information for modelers to create and add realistic detail to their PRR right-of-way and model railroad operations.  Scherb stated in the introduction, "Most of these items are also simple modeling projects, and many can fit into the 'one evening' category."  Most of Scherb's drawings were redrawn from original Pennsylvania Railroad standard plans, photographs, and other sources because few original structures remain.  He cautions that every attempt was made to ensure that the drawings are accurate, but it is likely that some drawings have minor deviations from the exact prototype dimensions.  The drawings are organized in four chapters.  Structures includes drawings dating from 1895 through 1914 of passenger shelters, watch boxes, tool houses, signal cabins, water tanks, passenger and freight platforms, and more.  Bridges and Culverts includes drawings dating from 1909 through 1925 of concrete arch culverts and bridges, timber trestle bridges, a timber coal trestle, and a  concrete coal trestle.  Signals begins with seven pages presenting 14 different explanations of signals rules followed by drawings for signals position lights, signal bridges, markers for switches and signals, end of block and fouling point signs, a block limit signal and sign, a distant switch indicator, a color light flag station, blades for semaphore signals, smashboards, a telephone box, and wooden mail cranes dating from 1894 through 1949.  Signs presents drawings of prototypes dating from 1889 though 1952.   Included are a wide variety of common signs including grade crossings, stations, trespassing, mile and section  markers, and signs to identify physical structures such as bridges.  In addition, a chart showing the Pennsylvania's standard letters and numbers is included.  Each chapter begins with a two-page written introduction. See also: Pennsylvania Railroad Company, Office of Engineer of Maintenance of Way (1901) Maintenance of way plans: containing plans approved as standard, also those in use but not fully recognized as standards and Smith, Harold T. (1967) Pennsylvania Railroad standard maintenance of way plans. (95 pages, book, obtained from The Library of Congress)
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  110. Scherb, Jeff. (2004). Trackside on the Pennsylvania, vol. 2: Standard Plans of the Standard Railroad of the World. Aurora, CO: Highlands Station, Inc.
    Not yet annotated.)

  111. Sherry, Allan. (1979). Pennsylvania Railroad steam locomotive final roster. Riverdale, NY: Author.
    Sherry's compilation of PRR steam locomotives lists each locomotive in order by its engine number.  Data is presented for each locomotive in columns indicating the class, builder, date of construction & construction number, boiler pressure, re-numbering & date, conversion & date, whether in service after 1938, termination of service date, and disposition.  (56 pages, book)
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  112. Smith, Harold T. (1967). Pennsylvania Railroad standard maintenance of way plans. Clifton, VA: Boynton & Associates.
    The cover title of this book is, 57 Plans Compiled in the Office of Chief Engineer of Maintenance of Way for the Pennsylvania Railroad.  Smith states in the introduction that he took these plans from a “beat-up loose-leaf binder” with “M.W.61. Standard Maintenance of Way Plans” on the cover.  The binder, which he discovered in a neighbor’s collection, contained several hundred plans.  The 57 schematic drawings included in this book are the same size (6.25 inches x 9 inches) as those in the loose-leaf binder, which Smith supposes were reduced from the original blue prints.  The diagrams in this book were selected because of their potential use to modelers and railroad fans.  They are dated from 1902 to 1918 and include a wide variety of structures.  Standard four track roadways, retaining walls, 85 & 125 pound rails and splices, road crossing grades, turnouts & crossovers, passenger & freight platforms, timber coal trestles, cattle guards, tool houses, passenger shelters, station signs, signal bridges, foundations for turntables, road crossing signs, steel water tanks, and many other structures are included.  All plans contain detailed labels, measurements, notes, and dates.  See also: Pennsylvania Railroad Company, Office of Engineer of Maintenance of Way (1901) Maintenance of way plans: containing plans approved as standard, also those in use but not fully recognized as standards and Scherb, Jeff (2002) Trackside on the Pennsylvania: Standard Plans of the Standard Railroad of the World - Structures, Bridges, Signals and Signs.  (57 pages, book, obtained from Cape May County Library)
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  113. Smith, Harold T. (1973). Pennsylvania Railroad standard maintenance of way plans. Cossaguna, NY: Author.
    This is a reprint of the 1967 edition. See above.

  114. Spearman, Frank H. (1904). The strategy of great railroads. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons.
    Spearman presents thirteen essays each addressing a different railroad system, including the Pennsylvania system, the Vanderbilt Lines (New York Central), the Union Pacific, the Atchison, the Chicago and Northwestern, and others.  His essay on the Pennsylvania (pages 23 through 46) briefly discusses some history and development of the Pennsylvania system, but focuses on management strategies to effectively address demands for passenger and freight railroad service which experienced enormous growth in traffic during the period of general prosperity from 1901 to 1906.  His interesting treatment highlights not only the material and financial accomplishments of the Pennsylvania, but also its innovative and beneficent approach to treatment of its employees.  He also illuminates the personality and skills of the Pennsylvania's seventh president, Alexander Johnston Cassatt, who served from 1899 through 1906.  (287 pages, book, obtained from South Dakota State University Library)
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  115. Staufer, Alvin F. (Ed.). (1960). Steam and electric locomotive diagrams of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Medina, OH: Author.
    Staufer explains in an introductory paragraph that the PRR did not issue bound locomotive diagram books, as did many other railroad companies.  Instead the Pennsy distributed individual blueprints to its division motive power departments.  Staufer presents about 95 steam and electric locomotive blueprints and about 15 early diesel blueprints in this 10.5 X 4 inch paperback.  The drawings show measurements as well as some technical specifications such as steam pressures and weights.  (111 pages, book)
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  116. Staufer, Alvin F., Edson, William D., & Harley, E. Thomas. (1993). Pennsy power III: 1847-1968, steam, electric, MU's, motor cars, diesels, cars, buses, trucks, airplanes, boats, art. Medina, OH: Staufer.
    Staufer's third volume in the Pennsy Power series is a very ambitious and, to me, the most interesting of the three books.  Volume one covered steam and electric locomotives from 1900-1962.  Volume two focused on multiple units and diesel locomotives.  Volume three contains lengthy chapters on steam, electric, and diesel locomotives.  In addition, it completes the depiction of the diverse types of power owned by the Pennsylvania Railroad by covering pre-1900 locomotives, and by devoting 66 pages to passenger, freight and work cars, and 62 pages to buses, trucks, airplanes and boats.  Staufer reminds us in his introduction that the PRR was a total transportation system with the largest floating fleet in America, a large trucking (both highway and piggyback) service, two major air services, and the Greyhound bus company.  Staufer shows the reader this total transportation company through 1,300 captioned black-and-white photographs taken by a long list of photographers and through numerous brief segments of informative text written by Staufer and William D. Edson.  Interspersed among the photographs are many charts, drawings, diagrams, and maps.  In addition, Staufer presents 19 pages of PRR artwork at the end of volume three, including 16 full-page color reproductions of art by Grif Teller, Ted Xaras, Craig Staufer, Ron Johnston, and himself.  Staufer claims there is no duplication of text or pictures in these three Pennsy Power volumes, and, together, they provide a remarkable picture of what was a remarkable railroad.  (512 pages, book)
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  117. Staufer, Alvin F., & Pennypacker, Bert. (1968). Pennsy power II: steam, diesel and electric locomotives of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Medina, OH. Staufer.
    This book, the second of three Pennsy Power installments by Staufer and Pennypacker, was produced as the mighty "P" Co. took its last breath.  The authors admit in the forward of this book that they are "steam devotees and sentimentalists at heart", and the book includes a lengthy chapter on steam locomotives.  Although these locomotives were covered in the first installment, this volume provides additional glimpses of mighty steam locomotives during their glory years and then during their waning years when they worked side-by-side with diesels.  It also includes a chapter showing the continued importance of electric locomotives on the Pennsylvania during the company's later years.  In addition, the book presents a thirty-page chapter covering the bi-directional multiple-unit passenger cars that became so important during the 1950s and 1960s, and then moves on to the diesel age.  The diesel chapter provides a photo-roster of diesel locomotives updated to July 1, 1967.  The chapter is organized by general type (switchers, road-switchers, passenger, freight) and by builders' names and horsepower under each general type.  The photo captions include a general description of the unit, the PRR road classification and road numbers, basic mechanical specifications, and mechanical changes, renumberings and retirements.  Often schematic drawings of locomotives are included.  Pennypacker provides introductory text for each chapter and Staufer did the layout, editing, art work, and photograph captions.  This volume provides a useful picture of PRR locomotives especially showing the transition from steam to diesel.  Over 540 black-and-white photographs of locomotives are included.  In addition, some useful tabular information is presented, including a table listing the PRR motive power as of July 1, 1947, and a March 1, 1966 list of PRR electric multiple-unit passenger cars.   (351 pages, book)
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  118. Staufer, Alvin F., Pennypacker, Bert, & Flattley, Martin. (1962). Pennsy power: steam and electric locomotives of the Pennsylvania Railroad, 1900-1957. Carrollton, OH: Standard Printing & Publishing Co.
    This is the first of three Pennsy Power books by Staufer, and it presents a very informative and fascinating look at Pennsy's steam and electric locomotives.  Staufer did all layout, production, organization, picture selection, caption writing and art work.  Pennypacker helped with text writing and Flattley helped with the research for this volume.  The forward explains the time span was selected because it represented the "Golden Years of Steam Railroading" when most of the significant locomotives were built. The cut-off year, 1957, was the last year of service for steam.  However, some electric data were added to update that section to 1962.  Each chapter covers a specific engine class and includes text about the history and design of the locomotive, brief representative technical specifications, and numerous captioned photographs (more than 700 in all).   In addition, Staufer has included many extra attractions such as photographs and information about the Altoona shops and the Horseshoe Curve, diagrams of the Pennsy's famous Belpaire boiler, a 1959 map of Pennsy's electrified lines, and 33 small black-and-white reproductions of PRR calendars.  (320 pages, book)
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  119. Stroup, John P. (1996). Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines: in color. Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Stroup’s book does not present a substantial amount of new information about the PRSL.  Only two pages of text are devoted to a review of the line’s history.  However this attractive book packages some very interesting color photographs of PRSL equipment and facilities taken during the 1950s and 1960s.  Lengthy and informative captions accompany photographs that show PRSL trains and facilities at various locations including Shore tower, Jersey tower, Divide interlocking, Jordan block station, Collingswood, West Haddonfield, Haddonfield, Kirkwood, Lindenwold, West Berlin, Bishops Bridge, Ancora, Winslow, Atlantic City, Ocean City, Wildwood, Cape May, Camden, Haddon Heights, Laurel Springs, Williamstown Junction, Brown, Gloucester, Brooklawn, Glassboro, Vineland, Millville, Carneys Point, and others.  The photographs include Stroup’s own work as well as the work of Ron Baile, Will Coxey, Joe Grella, Al Holtz, Ed Kelsey, Frank Kozempel, Bob Long, Dick Short, Karl Then, and Bill and Steve Tilden.  About 215 photographs are included providing a description of the PRSL’s freight and passenger operations.  In addition, much information is presented from PRSL timetables and promotional brochures, and maps (many produced by Stroup).  The book also includes information about Atlantic City race trains, the terminal points for PRSL train number series, the PRSL’s customer relationship with the Baldwin Locomotive Works, a diesel locomotive roster, and an electric car roster.  Stroup refers the reader to By Rail to the Boardwalk by Gladulich for more detailed historical information.   This a very enjoyable collection of PRSL photographs.  (128 pages, book, obtained from The State Historical Society of Wisconsin)
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  120. Sweetland, David R. (1992). Pennsy steam years. (Vol. 1). Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books, Inc.
    Sweetland has created a fun book that depicts the Pennsy's steam locomotive fleet through more than 180 marvelous full-color photographs.  The photographs present a cross-section of Pennsy steam power captured from 1942 to 1957.  The author started working for the PRR at the Altoona works in 1959 when "the steam giants were all retired and some were still sleeping at East Altoona", and this book ably serves as his tribute to the Pennsy's mighty steam machines.  The book has only a few pages of straight text, which presents a brief history of the Pennsylvania's steam locomotive building accomplishments with special emphasis, of course, on the Altoona works.   Information about each class of Pennsy steam locomotives is presented including brief technical data, the years of construction, and the number of units built.  However, beginning on page 9 the photographs and interesting captions tell most of the tale.  The show begins with views of steam muscle on the Long Island RR and the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines.  The action continues through Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Altoona, Hollidaysburg, the Horseshoe Curve and then on to Bellevue and Sandusky, OH, St. Louis and Chicago with other trips to Shamokin, Wilkes-Barre, Elmira, NY, Hagerstown, MD, and other locations.  Adding to the charm of this book are numerous full-color illustrations taken from PRR advertisements, timetables, and other promotional materials that are interspersed among the photographs.  This is volume 1 of several Pennsy all-color books produced by Morning Sun Books.  (128 pages, book)
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  121. Sweetland, David R., & Yanosey, Robert J. (1992). PRR color guide to freight and passenger equipment. Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books, Inc.
    Most railroad photographic works are devoted to the motive power end of the trains.  However Sweetland and Yanosey point out that a large portion of any railroad's investment is devoted to its freight and passenger cars.  The PRR had the largest single-ownership fleet of freight and passenger cars in the United States.  For example, in 1962 the Pennsy owned 3,546 passenger cars and 139,356 freight cars, and many of these cars were developed and built (or modified or rebuilt) in the PRR shops of Altoona or Hollidaysburg.  This work presents over 320 captioned color photographs of Pennsy freight and passenger cars, "reproducing as nearly as possible the actual colors of significant classes of this huge fleet during the post war years..."  The photographs show the color schemes, decal placements, numbering, and the effects of the elements and years of use on the equipment.  The work is organized as Pennsy organized its equipment, by a primary class letter: B for baggage cars, BM for baggage and mail cars, D for dining cars, M for mail cars, P for passenger cars, Z for Business cars, F for flat cars, G for gondola cars, H for hopper cars, K for stock cars, R for refrigerator cars, X for box cars, and N for cabin cars.  See also: Fischer (1996).  (128 pages, book)
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  122. Trostel, Scott D. (1987). Bradford the railroad town: a railroad town history of Bradford, Ohio. Fletcher, OH: Cam-Tech Publishing.
    Bradford, Ohio was a railroad town for 130 years.  Like many railroad towns it came into existence and grew to meet the needs of the railroad, and it suffered severe economic and social depression when the railroad abandoned it between 1929 and 1931.  Located in west central Ohio, approximately 20 miles east of the Indiana line and 30 miles north-west of Dayton, a small village called Union City Junction was formed in 1854 around a timber camp to supply ties, bridge timbers, and firewood to the Columbus Piqua & Indiana Railroad.  By 1863-64 the Columbus & Indianapolis Railroad had taken over the CP&I and was joined at Union City Junction by the Richmond & Covington Railroad from the south.  The Columbus & Indianapolis purchased the R&C and consolidated the Indiana Central to from the Columbus & Indianapolis Central Railway late in 1864.  In 1866 a post office was established and the name of the growing village was changed to Bradford Junction.  The Pennsylvania's relationship with the town began in the late 1860's when C&IC construction from Union City to Logansport was financed by the Pennsylvania Company.  In 1868 consolidation brought the C&IC and the Chicago and Great Eastern together to form the Columbus Chicago and Indiana Central Railway.  Bradford's importance to the railroad was recognized by the relocation of the terminal, roundhouse and shops from Piqua to Bradford.  In 1869 the Pennsylvania Company formed the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railway Company and leased the CC&IC.  This book provides an interesting look at life in this Pennsylvania Railroad town including much informative text and 120 photographs, illustrations and maps.  The focus is on the relationship between the railroad and the citizens in the town.  Chapters like "Life of a Railroad Man" and "Iron Horses and Men of Steel" reveal the hard and dangerous work required of railroad employees.  Numerous railroad wrecks and several fires and discussed.  Also covered are the Railroad's many economic, social, and service contributions to the town, such as the railroad YMCA and the railroad fire department.  In 1925 W.W. Atterbury, PRR President, advanced the idea that the number of outlying terminals and the yarding of engines and crews should be consolidated to increase the train speeds between Columbus, Logansport, and Indianapolis.  By 1931 practically all Bradford operations had been discontinued except the storage of dead locomotives and freight cars, and only eleven people were employed in the whole terminal complex.  Prior to that time Bradford was practically a one-industry town, a railroad town.  The closing of the railroad facilities was a devastating blow.  The book also includes a "Periodic Review of Passenger Train Service" departing Bradford between 1859 to 1959, a chronology of railroads operating through Bradford, a list of locomotives used through Bradford for selected years from 1852 to 1957, a partial record of railroad injuries and deaths within Bradford proper, a short bibliography, an index, and two folded maps of Bradford and the railroad terminal area.  (152 pages, book)
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  123. Volkmer, William D. (1991). Pennsy electric years. Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books, Inc.
    Volkmer presents a very attractive and very interesting photographic description of the state of the PRR electrification in the last ten of so years of the Pennsy (1958-1968).  During this period he was an employee of the railroad's Mechanical Department, and this experience allowed him to add many personal observations and remembrances to the introductory text of each photographic layout.  Volkmer presents a brief chronology of important dates in PRR electrification, but does not attempt to provide any detailed history, which has been previously published in several other books.  This book consists of many one or two-page color photographic layouts each with brief introductory text by Volkmer and captions for each photograph.  Volkmer states, "it was non-GG-1 locos that gave the spice and flavor to the Pennsy electric scene,” and the photographs in this book exemplify that spice with numerous photographs of P-5a, E-44, FF-2, B-1 yard goats, and other electric locomotives in addition to GG-1s.  The photographs and text illustrate numerous Pennsy electrified settings such as Merion, PA, Sunnyside Yard in Queens, NY, the Hudson River tunnels, North Philadelphia, 30th Street Station, Trenton, NJ, and several branches such as Greenville Branch, Princeton Branch, Chestnut Hill Branch, and others.  The book includes more than 180 quality color photographs.  R.J. (Bob)  Yanosey contributed the cover design, layout and typesetting to this book.  (128 pages, book)
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  124. Volkmer, William D. (1994). PRR: Hudson to horseshoe. Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books, Inc.
    In PRR: Hudson to Horseshoe, Volkmer repeats his previous successful style of high-quality color photographs accompanied by interesting and informative text.  This is another appealing photographic description of the Pennsylvania during its last decade when the company was struggling with equipment obsolescence concurrent with the end of steam, government regulation, and fierce competition from highways and airports.  This book focuses on the area between the Hudson River and the Allegheny Mountains, which offered a great variety of types of operations, equipment, scenery, and motive power.  Volkmer begins his photographic journey with Pennsy tugboats on the Hudson River and travels west to the Alleghenies and the Horseshoe Curve.  As he did in Pennsy Electric Years, Volkmer used his experience in the PRR Maintenance of Equipment Department to add substance to the brief text in the form of personal knowledge and recollections.  Of course, the many superb photographs (over 200) are the main attraction in this book.  R.J. (Bob) Yanosey contributed the layout and typesetting to this book.  (128 pages, book)
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  125. Ward, James A. (1980). J. Edgar Thomson: Master of the Pennsylvania. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
    Ward presents a biography of Thomson's business and professional life principally based upon surviving letters that Thomson sent to others.  After being chief engineer of the Georgia Railroad Company, Thomson became chief engineer of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in 1847 and then served as its president from 1852 until his death in 1874.  Thomson guided the PRR through the Civil War and then through the period of rapid growth during the great industrial boom after the war.  He assembled a very talented management team, including Andrew Carnegie and A.J. Cassatt.  This biography does not illuminate much about Thomson's inner feelings or personal life.   However as Robert E. Carlson states in his review in the September 1981 Journal of American History, "Ward has produced a first-rate biography, a pleasure to read, and a model for biographers of business and industrial leaders to imitate."  (265 pages, bibliography, book)
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  126. Warner, Paul T. (1959). Locomotives of the Pennsylvania Railroad, 1834-1924. Chicago: Owen Davies.
    This book is a collection of three articles by Warner which were originally published as Motive Power Development, Pennsylvania Railroad System in three issues of Baldwin Locomotives in April, July, and October, 1924.  The first article traces the development of the Pennsylvania's motive power up to 1868, when the company adopted standard locomotive designs.  The second article covered the period from 1868 to 1898, and the third article discusses locomotive development from 1898 to 1924.  Warner obtained much data and many photographs from the PRR's Motive Power Department and from the Baldwin Locomotive Works.  He also consulted several published books and articles including, those by William B. Sipes, W.B. Wilson, and C.H. Caruthers.  Warner presents black and white photographs and/or illustrations along with technical data and narrative regarding each locomotive type or class.  Also included are five photographs of PRR steam power from the 1940s and 1950s.  (79 pages, book)
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  127. Watt, William J. (1999). The Pennsylvania Railroad in Indiana (Railroads past and present). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
    At the time of publication of this book, Watt was a board member of the Center for Railroad Photography and Art and a former executive assistant for Indiana Governor Otis R. Bowen and Lt. Governor Richard E. Folz.  He was also a former administrator for policy at the Federal Railroad Administration and chaired the state Transportation Coordinating Board and Indiana Transportation Finance Authority.  In addition he is a former Associated Press writer and editor, and the book is written in a journalistic style.  Sources are not footnoted in the work, although he provides a three-page selected bibliography at the end.  The book does not provide much information that is not already available in other sources.  However, it does bring a widely dispersed assortment of information together for more convenient access by the casual reader.  This book does not provide a great deal of depth, but it serves as a good basic outline of Pennsylvania Railroad activities in the Midwest.  A large number of pages are used to discuss the economic, political, social, and technological situations of the PRR as a whole.  Many readers may wish that Watt had provided more depth regarding PRR history in Indiana and less general coverage of PRR system history.  However, Watt’s stated journalistic approach makes an appealing and worthwhile contribution regarding the 125 years that the PRR impacted the economic condition of the state of Indiana.  The book consists of thirteen chapters, a selected bibliography, and an index.  It contains 71 black-and-white photographs, most related to Indiana, and some are very unique and interesting.  In addition numerous other illustrations, many from PRR promotional materials, and several route maps are included.  This book is part of the publisher’s Railroads Past and Present series, edited by George Smerk.  (192 pages, book, obtained from the Florida International University Library)
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  128. Wayner, Robert J. (Ed.). (1969). Pennsy car plans. New York: Wayner Publications.
    This is a book of diagrams of Pennsylvania Railroad passenger, freight and maintenance-of-way cars.  According to the introduction, it presents a selected roster of rolling stock through diagrams reproduced from existing pre-merger class book tracings.  Wayner cautions that some classes of cars were not represented in the class books and some diagrams were not in reproducible condition.  Other than the introduction, there is no text in this book.  It consists of ninety-nine, 6.5 X 9.5 inch, pages of car diagrams with measurements and some technical data included.  Passenger cars include both exterior and interior diagrams.  See also: Staufer (1960).  (99 pages, book)
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  129. Wayner, Robert J. (Ed.). (1981). Pennsylvania Railroad passenger and freight car diagrams. New York: Wayner Publications.
    This book presents schematic drawings of PRR passenger and freight cars on 8.25 x 10.75 inch pages.  Each drawing shows exterior (side and end) views and overhead interior views (for passenger cars) with measurements.  Most include additional information such as car class, weight, builder, year built (for some), seating capacity (for passenger), freight capacity (weight and cubic feet), number of rooms (if appropriate), and other information.  Wayner states on the title page, “The diagrams in this book were selected from all surviving pre-merger class book tracings.  Certain classes of cars were not represented in the available plans, nor was every tracing in a reproducible condition.”  I agree with Wayner that this book provides an extensive “panorama of Pennsy rolling stock including some rare and unusual cars...”  Unfortunately the book does not contain an index or list of the cars or classes of cars it covers.  There is no mention of the 1969 edition in this book.  (103 pages, book, obtained form North Carolina State University Libraries)
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  130. Wells, Janice Cooper. (1987). The handsomest building on the road. Salem, OH: J.C. Wells.
    Wells provides a brief history of the Pennsylvania Railroad station in Salem, Ohio.  She begins with a brief railroad history Salem, Ohio, where railroad lines from Pittsburgh were completed in 1852.  The Ohio and Pennsylvania Railroad went on to connect to the Ohio and Indiana Railroad at Crestline and the Fort Wayne and Chicago line.  These three lines were consolidated in 1856 forming the Pittsburgh, Ft. Wayne, and Chicago, which became part of the Pennsylvania in 1869.  This short, self-published, book concentrates on the Salem depots, especially the Pennsylvania Railroad Company's stone depot built in 1892.  The book includes a map of Salem, several photographs, a list of station agents, and a short bibliography.  (54 pages, book, examined at the Library of Congress)
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  131. Welsh, Joe. (1999). Pennsy streamliners: the blue ribbon fleet. Waukesha, WI: Kalmbach Publishing Co.
    Welsh presents a very interesting portrayal of the transformation of the Pennsy’s huge fleet of passenger trains from chunky heavyweight equipment to streamlined lightweight cars.  He covers the social, economic, demographic, and technological developments that influenced the transformation, and reveals the challenges faced, and decisions made, by PRR executives from the mid-thirties through the Broadway Limited’s last run on December 12, 1967.  Of course the work of industrial designer Raymond Loewy in the development of the Fleet of Modernism is covered in detail.  Loewy had helped with the redesign of the GG1 electric locomotive and his “distinctive design touch would be evident from motive power to observation car, from structures to wastebaskets and, seemingly, everywhere in between.”  Welsh shows Mr. Loewy’s impact on passenger car design with numerous of interior and exterior photographs and illustrations of passenger equipment.  In addition, Welsh uses information from company documents to elucidate the thinking of PRR decision-makers and explain the company’s relationships with carmakers including Pullman and American Car and Foundry.  He also covers the PRR's relationships with competitors such as the New York Central.  Many passenger train consists spanning many years are included along with period advertisements and employee interviews.  Welsh provides a fascinating depiction of the factors that contributed to the development of the Fleet of Modernism and the postwar Blue Ribbon Fleet and the factors that lead to the demise of the mighty Pennsy passenger fleet after 20 years of deficit operations.  The following chapters are included: A Fleet of Modernism, A New Postwar Blue Ribbon Fleet, Through Cars and Trains of the Blue Ribbon Fleet, Home from the Road: Sunnyside – The Largest Coach Yard in the World, and The Long Goodbye.  The book also includes a glossary and index.  See also: Rosenbaum & Gall (1988).  (160 pages, book, obtained from Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR)
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  132. Westhaeffer, Paul J. (1979). History of the Cumberland Valley Railroad, 1835-1919. Washington, D.C.: National Railway Historical Society.
    Westhaeffer presents a very interesting history of this small railroad that had long ties to the Pennsylvania Railroad.  The Cumberland Valley lies in south central Pennsylvania, extending from the Susquehanna River near Harrisburg to the Potomac at Williamsport MD.  The Cumberland Valley Railroad came into existence after being promoted as a line that would connect, not to a proposed Baltimore line, but rather to a Pennsylvania mainline from Philadelphia.  By late 1839 the CVRR had trains running between Chambersburg and Harrisburg, a distance of 104 miles.   The CVRR connected to the Franklin Railroad, which ran between Chambersburg to Hagerstown, MD by 1841.  Over the years the Pennsylvania Railroad provided varying degrees of support to the CVRR and the two railroads enjoyed a mutually beneficial relationship until their merger in March 1919.  Thomas Alexander Scott, Vice President of the PRR from 1860 to 1847 and President of the PRR from 1874 to 1880, was also Director of the Cumberland Valley Railroad from 1860 to1880.  Moorhead Cowell Kennedy, Vice President of the Cumberland Valley Railroad from 1892 to 1913 and President of the CVRR from 1913 to 1919, served as Vice President of the PRR from 1919 to 1932.  Westhaeffer addresses the railroad’s legal identity, engineering, construction, operations, traffic, and finance.  He also covers the impact of nationwide economic and political factors including its status as a component of the Pennsylvania System.  In addition he addresses the railroad’s relationship with the communities it served and provides insight into the daily lives of the railroaders.  Although the book does not contain a formal bibliography, chapter notes are provided to identify source materials.  Westhaeffer states that he used official company records, coverage provided by several newspapers of the 1820 to 1920 period, and a great many interviews of veteran railroaders and others.  Many illustrations and photographs (approximately 200) add to the value of this work.  Half of the photographs are from the collection of Charles L. Pague of Shippensburg and include many taken by Clyde Laughlin of Shippensburg.  The chapters covering the Civil War and post-Civil War years are particularly interesting.  Appendices include a locomotive roster, a list of directors and officers, a graph of traffic growth, and a graph of receipts and expenditures.  The book also includes and index.  (339 pages, book, obtained from the State Historical Society of Wisconsin)
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  133. Westing, Fred. (1978). Penn Station: Its tunnels and side rodders. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company.
    Westing's book consists of two parts.  The first 117 pages are a reprint of William Couper's History of the Engineering Construction and Equipment of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company's New York Terminal and Approaches (see Couper, William, 1912).  This reprint excludes only 14 pages of advertisements that were printed at the end of  Couper's original publication.  The remaining 66 pages are Westing's contribution which describe the development of  Penny's electric traction with special emphasis on it's DD1 and L5 class jack-shaft, side-rod drive electric locomotives.  Numerous photographs and illustrations are included in Westing's material.  (184 pages, book)
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  134. Westing, Fred. (1974). Pennsy steam and semaphores. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company.
    Westing displays his love and knowledge of steam locomotives in this publication.  He states that his primary objective in this book is to present many rare vintage photographs of Pennsy train scenes from the period between 1890 up to the late 1920s.  He accomplishes this objective by including over 270 black-and-white photographs and numerous illustrations each accompanied by informative in-depth captions.  Passenger train scenes and locomotives predominate, with only one twenty-eight-page chapter covering freight equipment.  His "Facts and Figures" chapter includes much technical information about Pennsy locomotives including coal consumption records and excerpts from a Pennsy report regarding the effects on the engine crew of long distance runs of over 200 miles in one direction.  Westing's nine-page "Signals and Safety" chapter addresses the Pennsy's automatic block system of signals.  He also includes very interesting brief biographical and photographic essays on the careers of two PRR locomotive engineers, Martin H. Lee and Oliver P. Keller, who had been featured previously in Westing's Apex of the Atlantics.  This book is an excellent source of information about PRR steam power prior to the 1930s.  (187 pages, book)
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  135. Westing, Fred. (1982, c1974). Pennsy steam and semaphores. New York: Bonanza Books.
    This is a reprint of the 1974 edition published by Superior Publishing Company.)

  136. Westing, Frederick. (1963). Apex of the Atlantics. Milwaukee: Kalmbach Publishing Co.
    Westing presents the story of the E6s Atlantic (4-4-2) steam locomotives.  In 1914 the Pennsylvania Railroad's Altoona Works built 80 E6s locomotives for passenger service even though most railroads of the day believed the 4-4-2 was no longer practical due to the increased weight of all-steel passenger cars.  However the E6s became classic passenger locomotives for the Pennsy and remained in use until diesels took over.  Westing covers the development and history of the Atlantics including a chapter about Alfred W. Gibbs, General Superintendent of Motive Power for the road east of Pittsburgh from 1903 to 1911 and later the first and only Chief Mechanical Engineer at PRR's headquarters until his death in 1922.  Westing refers to Gibbs as the "father of the E6".  He and the engineers and workers at the Test Plant in Altoona were responsible for the development of the "Big E", the high-speed and high-horsepower Atlantic.   Westing's text is supplemented by 116 black-and-white photographs and numerous illustrations and data.  He also presents some human interest material including his coverage of two locomotives engineers, Martin H. Lee and Oliver P. Keller, and the inclusion of David P. Morgan's coverage (from the October 1952 issue of Trains & Travel) of the "Lindbergh Special", the E6s Atlantic that raced newsreels covering Charles Lindbergh's return to Washington, DC to New York's Manhattan Transfer.  The E6s delivered the newsreels an hour before those flown in by the competition.  (167 pages, book)
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  137. Wilson, William Bender. (1895). History of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company with plan of organization, portraits of officials and biographical sketches. (Vols. I and II). Philadelphia: Henry T. Coats & Company.
    This monumental work addresses the Pennsylvania Railroad Company's system east of Pittsburgh and Erie.  Bender provides a "plain narration of historical facts" describing the incorporation and organization of the company and the various railroad lines it owned, leased, or controlled and operated.   Volume I consists of seven chapters: I. Philadelphia to Harrisburg; II. Harrisburg to Altoona; III. Altoona to Pittsburgh; IV. General Agency, Philadelphia. D.E.&K. Division. Junction Railroad; V. Transportation Divisions; VI. The West Jersey and Seashore Railroad, The Allegheny Valley Railway, and the Cumberland Valley Railroad; and VII. The Railroad in War Times (Civil War).  Volume II adds three more chapters: VIII. Organization and Biography (biographical sketches of the present executives); IX. The Jubilee (including selections from Jubilee celebration addresses); and X. In Memoriam (biographical sketches and portraits of past PRR leaders).  Wilson states that it took him years to prepare this work, and that he gathered much of the information from his father who was Secretary of the Board of Canal Commissioners (Harrisburg, PA) and during his youth and early manhood from such men as William C. Patterson, William B. Foster, Jr., and Thomas A,. Scott.  (Volume I - 418 pages, Volume II - 323 pages, book)
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  138. Wilson, William Bender. (1900). General Superintendents of the Pennsylvania Railroad division. Philadelphia: The Kensington Press.
    Wilson presents a brief history of the position of General Superintendent of the Pennsylvania Railroad Division, which supervised the active operations of all the sub-departments of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company.  He then provides brief biographical information and photographs of 13 General Superintendents of the company from 1849 to the beginning of 1900.  The following General Superintendents are covered: John Edgar Thomson (June 8, 1849 - January 8, 1851), Herman Haupt (January 8, 1851 – November 1, 1858), Herman J. Lombaert (November 1, 1852 – January 1, 1858), Thomas A. Scott (January 1, 1858 – April 1, 1860), Enoch Lewis (April 1, 1860 – January 1, 1866), Edward H. Williams (January 1, 1866 – April 1, 1870), Alexander J. Cassatt (April 1870 – December 20, 1871, Mr. Cassatt was then made General Manager of all the PRR lines east of Pittsburgh and Erie, but he continued performing the General Superintendent duties until March 1, 1873), George Clinton Gardner (March 1, 1873 – April 1, 1879), Charles E. Pugh (April 1, 1879 – October 1, 1882), Sutherland M. Prevost (October 1, 1882 – May 1, 1885), Robert E. Pettit (May 1, 1885 – June 1, 1890), Frank E. Sheppard (June 1, 1890 – January 1, 1899), John M. Wallis (January 1, 1899 - ).  Three of these General Superintendents later became President, i.e., Thomson, Scott, and Cassatt.  (66 pages, book, examined at The Library of Congress)
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  139. Wilson, William Bender. (1902). From the Hudson to the Ohio: a region of historic, romantic and scenic interest, and other sketches. Philadelphia: Kensington Press.
    In this book Wilson presents a collection of short essays and remembrances, about his past experiences and philosophies, and sketches about some interesting or important people.  As may have been expected, the Pennsylvania Railroad is part of many of the essays and all the biographical sketches.  The book begins with the title piece, an eight-page description of a trip on the Pennsylvania Railroad from the Hudson River in New York to the Ohio River in Pittsburgh.  The piece reveals the grandeur, historical significance, and sensual experience of the environment along the way.  Wilson’s pleasing prose and quotations of others make the envious of that historic journey.  In “The Telegraph in Peace and War” Wilson tells of his experiences as a telegraph operator in the 1850s and 1860s.  He began as a messenger boy for the Atlantic and Ohio Telegraph Company.  Later he worked for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and for the Military Telegraph Corps during the Civil War.  He describes stretching a silk covered wire from hiding places in the crevices of decayed trees, tree stumps, and fence rails to partially dismantled telegraph lines to keep government officials informed about the war.  In “Black Dick” Wilson pays tribute to a man named Richard who became famous for his unselfish efforts to keep the travelers at the Pennsylvania Railroad Station in Harrisburg safe by running in front of the locomotives to clear people from the tracks.  “Transportation Panels in the Broad Street Station” describes the work of the famous Austrian sculptor, Karl Bitter.  Wilson devotes 116 pages to biographical/career sketches of PRR directors, executives, and managers.  Included are three directors of the Pennsylvania Railroad that were appointed after completion of his History of the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1899 (Thomas De Witt Cuyler, Lincoln Godfrey, and James McCrea), a Secretary of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company (Lewis Neilson), two Assistant Secretaries (A.J. County and Kane Stovell Green), two Division Freight Agents (George D. Ogden and Robert C. Wright), and a Company Surgeon (Dr. William R. Blakeslee).  Wilson also presents a brief declaration of the importance of a freight agent to the railroad.  “…not less than seventy per cent of the revenues passing into the corporation’s treasury is collected by them.”  He includes sketches of the lives and careers of the following freight agents: E.E.Zeigler (Pittsburgh), Edwin R. Stewart (Wilmerding), F.S. Deckert (Johnstown), Abel Lloyd (Ebensburg), A.T. Heintzelman (Altoona), W.B. Humes (Bellwood), A. Elliott (Huntingdon), W.W. Fuller (Mount Union), Thomas L. Wallace and W.L. Fry (Harrisburg), Robert S. Beatty (Buffalo), C.S. Murray (Columbia), E.K. Davis (Lancaster), F.H Meyers (Philadelphia), William Hammersley (Broad and Washington Avenue District), Charles C. Kinney (Washington Avenue Wharf District), D.R. Richardson (Kensington District), Robert L. Franklin (Germantown Junction), John T. Robb (Pier 19, New York), and W.W. Bowie (Washington, D.C.).  Next, Wilson presents a twenty-six-page tribute to four men: Edward Miller (1811-1872), Joseph D. Potts (1829-1893), John Clark Sims (1845-1901), and Colonel Edwin Jefferies (1815-1899).  Photographs accompany most of the biographical sketches and there is an index at the end of the book.  (206 pages, book, obtained from University of Nebraska at Omaha Library)
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  140. Wilson, William Bender. (1911). History of the Pennsylvania Railroad Department of the Young Men's Christian Association of Philadelphia. Philadelphia: Stephen Greene Company.
    Railroading in the early days was accompanied by the rough and wild behavior of railroad employees.  Intoxication was so prevalent that construction deadlines and train schedules were often sacrificed, and railroad companies realized that their early attempts to regulate such behavior through rules had little effect.  To attempt to mitigate these problems the first railroad Young Men's Christian Association had formed in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1872.  In the winter of 1876-77, Thomas A Scott, then President of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, joined with William H. Vanderbilt, John W. Garrett, Cornelius Vanderbilt and Morris K. Jessup to promote the Railroad Departments of the Young Men's Christian Association.  Following Presidents Scott's endorsement, the PRR Young Men's Christian Association was formed in Philadelphia in May of 1877.  A constitution and by-laws were adopted by an enthusiastic group of representatives from the PRR shops, warehouses, and general offices.  Wilson presents a detailed year-by-year history of the organization from 1877 through 1909 when there were 2,338 members.  He covers the work of the organization and its numerous committees, including membership rosters, financial data, organization events, speakers and their speeches, and short biographical information on significant people.  An eight-page tribute to the late Alexander J. Cassatt, PRR President from 1899-1906, is presented covering a meeting on December 28th and a memorial service on December 30th, 1906, which includes several speeches in his honor.  Also, the book includes a four-page biographical sketch of Col. William Bender Wilson who was a long-time member and officer of the organization.  In addition, to writing the two-volume History of the Pennsylvania Railroad, he was honored by Congress and the Secretary of War for his heroic service during the Civil War as a military telegrapher and scout.  He later served as Superintendent of Telegraph of the Northern Central Railway, then as Superintendent of the Mantua Transfer, and the Special Agency of the Philadelphia terminal Division.  A very religious and civic-minded man, Wilson ends his book by stating that the rough railroad pioneers of history have "by reason of the educational methods of the Young Men's Christian Association" ... "advanced in knowledge, refinement and gentleness" ... "and his footsteps are either moving with, or being directed toward, the Church of Christ".  (296 pages, book)
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  141. Wood, Don. (1973). I Remember Pennsy. Earlton, NJ: Audio-Visual Designs.
    Wood photographed the Pennsy at work beginning immediately after World War II and continuing until the mighty railroad's demise when it merged with the New York Central.  This book features approximately 225 of his photographs, most recorded during the mid-to-late fifties and most black-and-white.  There are many quite striking and quite interesting photographs in this work.  After a forward written by David P. Morgan of Trains Magazine, Wood includes eight chapters that present brief one-page introductory text to set the stage for numerous captioned photographs.  His chapter on The New York & Long Branch, a 38.4 mile commuter line shared with Pennsy co-owner Jersey Central, is his longest chapter (32 pages).  This extensive coverage seems warranted because the "Long Branch Route" was the "final stamping grounds for Pennsy's legendary K4s Pacifics".  Wood also provides very interesting views of the Wilmington Shops, Enola Yard, the East Altoona Shops, and many other busy PRR locales.  In the forward David P. Morgan states the point of this pictorial is "the Pennsylvania Railroad managed to be different and huge and engaging," and that he is "glad that the big system attracted a photographer with the enthusiasm, the energy, and the skill of Don Wood".  (168 pages, book)
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  142. Yanosey, Robert J. (1988). Pennsy diesel years (Vol. 1). Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    In the introduction to volume one of this exquisite six-volume set Bill Volkmer reminds us that standardization no longer existed on the "Standard Railroad of the World" during the PRR's diesel years.  Instead the Pennsy's extensive fleet of diesel locomotives (numbering 2,465 in 1960) was made up of almost every make and model of diesel power that was available.  In addition the locomotives were scattered to small engine houses that were located all over the PRR system.  The roster contained many unusual and even unique locomotives.  That widely diverse collection of diesel motive power provided plenty of subjects for Yanosey's photographic depiction.  About 270 full-color photographs are presented in volume one, including the work of Bob Malinoski, Marty Zak, Jack Swanberg, Tom McNamara, Charlie Brown, Ken Douglas, Dick Flock, Bill Volkmer, and Bill Brennan.  Their photographs show diesel locomotives working in many scenic and interesting Pennsy locations.  The high-quality photographs are quite beautiful and the lengthy captions inform the reader about the mechanical power and the locations.  A six-page roster of the Pennsylvania Railroad diesel-electric locomotives as of December 15, 1960 compiled by W.D. Volkmer is presented at the end.  (160 pages, book)
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  143. Yanosey, Robert J. (1989). Pennsy diesel years (Vol. 2). Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Yanosey continues his photographic record of Pennsy diesel locomotives with over 200 beautiful scenes of working diesel power.  Volume two begins at the Hudson River and  the scenery continues to the Great Lakes area with lengthy and informative captions.   The photographs of Bob Malinoski, Marty Zak, Jack Swanberg, Tom McNamara, Dick Flock, Bill Brennan (who also contributed the introduction), Bill Volkmer, Chester Fuhrmann, Dave Sweetland, Al Di Censo, Roy Ward, and Dick Short are included.  A five-page "Pennsylvania Railroad Diesel Roster - December 16, 1960 to January 31, 1968, Second Generation and Renumbered Units Only", compiled by Mark Branibar, is also included in the back of volume two.  (128 pages, book)
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  144. Yanosey, Robert J. (1990). Pennsy diesel years (Vol. 3). Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Yanosey's third photographic journey through Pennsy's diesel years presents an additional 180 beautiful color photographs of working diesel locomotives in diverse PRR locations.  Most shots were taken in the mid-sixties supplemented by several from the late fifties and late sixties.  In the introduction, David R. Sweetland, reminds the reader that beginning in 1962 the Pennsy radically changed its utilization of diesel locomotives by using multiple units consisting of various engine types.  Until then, the Pennsy used only multiple in kind units.  This change enabled a more efficient use of motive power even though it required some equipment modifications because MU connections were not standard between engine types.  This book includes many photos of interesting lashups including the mixing of first and second generation locomotives.  Yanosey begins the book with a very interesting essay using excerpts from Pennsy annual reports to show the evolution of the diesel as a symbol of railroading innovation in 1947 to "just another tool in one of the Company's less profitable endeavors in 1965".  The photographs provide some unique and very interesting scenes of PRR diesel operations including rubber-tired diesels (tractors) used in Baltimore and Jersey City, the Bel-Del operation at Phillipsburg, VO-660 and VO-1000 (commonly know as Very Olds) diesel switchers in the Philadelphia area, the Delmarva Branch and the float yard at Cape Charles VA, the Renovo Shops and RS3 number 8445 (Hammerhead), Alco DL640s and C630s, Conemaugh and Johnstown, Pitcairn Yard, and many more.  A very interesting glimpse of freight train operations at Madison Hill, IN, the steepest grade (5.89%) on a regular railroad in the US includes a reprint of "Instructions for Preparation and handling of Freight Trains on Grades, etc. 1155-A1 Columbus-Madison Secondary Track. (Madison Hill.)"  In addition the book includes many illustrations taken from PRR annual reports from 1947-1966 and a list of Diesel acquisitions culled from PRR annual reports from 1928-1968.  (128 pages, book)
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  145. Yanosey, Robert J. (1991). Pennsy diesel years (Vol. 4). Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Yanosey continues his fascinating and colorful depiction of the Pennsylvania  diesel locomotive herd in this fourth installment of Pennsy Diesel Years.  In the introduction Robert Malinoski, the excellent railroad photographer, reminds the reader that photographers were treated to almost unending variety due to the diversity and immensity of the PRR diesel fleet.  Volume 4 of this series proves that there is plenty more to see.  It opens with a portion of an article entitled "The Pennsy's Predicament" which was first printed in the March 1948 issue of Fortune Magazine.  The article states that the Pennsy's problems immediately after World War II were caused by its lack of modern motive power, i.e., diesel locomotives.  The PRR had focused on completion of  the electrification of its eastern lines and also upon not antagonizing the coal producers, its biggest customers.  Therefore Pennsy did not begin dieselization until 1947 when it was already far behind in earning power compared to its competitors.  The book then shows more of the awesome diesel power fleet that the Pennsy had developed by the 1960s through about 180 color photographs taken by some of the best railroad photographers.  The works of W.D. Volkmer, William Coxey, David R. Sweetland, K. Allen Keller, Al Roberts, Bob Watson, Fred Cheney, Roy Ward, the author himself, and many others are included in this volume.  Like all the other volumes in this series, many interesting locations and equipment are shown.  Pages 10-35 cover Harrisburg to Atlantic City and include scenes of Harrisburg Station, Lebanon Valley Branch, Camden, Pavonia Yard, Pemberton Branch, Merchantville, and Haddonfield.  Pages 36-55 cover Williamsport to Sodus Point including Newberry Junction, Elmira Branch, Troy and Snedekerville, the tragic head-on collision of freights SS2 and SS3 at Orleans, NY, in May 1964, and the Sodus Point Coal Dock.  Pages 56-123 cover Altoona to Detroit including about 23 pages of the Altoona Cresson area, and 12 pages at the Conway Yard.  Throughout  the book there are numerous small illustrations from Pennsy promotional materials, timetables, covers from The Pennsy, and a few maps including a sketch of Conway yard. Another very useful feature of this volume is the "Index to Pennsy Diesel Years" covering volumes 1 through 4 of the series.  The index includes builder and engine class listings, location listings, and subject listings.  (128 pages, book)
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  146. Yanosey, Robert J. (1993). Pennsy diesel years (Vol. 5). Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    According to this book's introductory material, in the early 1950s the PRR management hired, for the first time in Pennsy history, a non-railroad consulting firm, Robert Heller & Associates of Cleveland, to recommend a management overhaul of the PRR system.  The board of Directors approved the reorganization plan in November, 1955, in an attempt to improve the PRR's ability to compete effectively with highways, pipelines, river barges, automobiles, etc.  The reorganization created nine regions, each with its own management that controlled operations, sales, and maintenance for the region; and each region competed with the other PRR regions.  This book uses the nine 1955 PRR regions to organize its tour of the Pennsy's diesel fleet.  Almost 200 vivid color photographs display (mostly) working diesel locomotives in interesting and many infrequently photographed locations.  The tour begins in the Lake Region including scenes from Detroit, Cleveland, and Canton.  The cameras then move to the Northern Region with several beautiful shots at Drocton Tower, Lock Haven, and Montandon.  Then the photos move to the New York Region  including scenes from the Meadows, Princeton Branch, and Bel-Del Branch.  Next the Philadelphia Region provides interesting shots at Greenwich Yard in South Philadelphia, Rockville, and Harrisburg.  The Chesapeake Region offers Clayton on the Delmarva Branch, and includes photos from Harrington, Delmar, and Royal Oak.  The Pittsburgh Region presents Banks, Thompsontown, the Horseshoe Curve (of course), and AR Tower in Gallitzin, PA.  Buckeye Region includes Columbus, Dayton, and Cincinnati.  The Southwestern Region includes Indianapolis, Terre Haute, and St. Louis, and the tour ends in the Northwestern Region with shots at Fort Wayne, Englewood, and Chicago.  PRR diesel power in shown in many other locations throughout this book along with maps and other miscellaneous graphics.  In addition a list of "Regional Monthly Maintenance Points of PRR Diesel Power by Classes and Unit Numbers on September 1, 1960" is printed at the end of the book.  (128 pages, book)
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  147. Yanosey, Robert J. (1996). Pennsy diesel years (Vol. 6). Edison, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Eight years after the first Pennsy Diesel Years book was published, Yanosey and Morning Sun Books issued this supposedly last volume in the series.  The six-volume series has preserved and made public over 1200 exquisite color photographs presented with informative captions, short essays, and numerous illustrations and reproductions of Pennsy promotional materials and other extras.  Although Yanosey originally intended to produce one volume of mostly black-and-white photographs, he quickly discovered that many caches of excellent color photographs by talented photographers were available.  Thus, one black-and-white volume turned into six color volumes over eight years.  Volume six opens with an introduction by William D. Volkmer about his six-month stint as the night roundhouse foreman at the 59th Street enginehouse, on Chicago's south side in 1963.  Volkmer claims that Chicago was where everything that had broken down in the 715 mile run from Enola ended up from repairs.  He goes on to state that Chicago "was about as far away from the head shed in Philadelphia" as possible, and that a shortage of parts and the diversity of equipment made for some interesting times.  He states, "...if the Pennsy found out that they had two diesel locomotives that were alike, they would have scrapped one of them, just to be consistent!"  The book presents its portrait of the PRR diesel power through a pictorial journey from Miami, FL, through Jacksonville, Louisville, Indianapolis, and South Bend to Chicago. Then a return journey to the east coast from Chicago through Gary, Warsaw, Fort Wayne, Lima, Upper Sandusky, Massillon, Conway, East Pittsburgh, Pitcairn, Cresson, Duncansville, Hollidaysburg, Horseshoe Curve, Altoona, Tyrone, Duncannon, Enola, Rockville, Harrisburg, Lancaster, Norristown, Philadelphia, Levittown, Jersey City, and New York City to journey's end at Penn Station.  Many other locations are traversed along the way.  Over 240 color photographs are included along with many PRR publicity reproductions.  Unfortunately no overall index to the six-volume series is included.  Like the other volumes in this series, volume six should not be neglected by those interested in the Pennsy or by diesel fans of any company.  (128 pages, book)
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  148. Yanosey, Robert J. (2008). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 1: New York Division, Sunnyside to Lane. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  149. Yanosey, Robert J. (2008). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 2: New York Division, Lane to Torresdale. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  150. Yanosey, Robert J. (2009). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 3: Philadelphia Division. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  151. Yanosey, Robert J. (2009). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 4: Chesapeake Division. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  152. Yanosey, Robert J. (2009). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 5: Harrisburg Division-Passenger Lines. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  153. Yanosey, Robert J. (2009). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 6: Harrisburg Division - Freight Lines. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  154. Yanosey, Robert J. (2010). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 7: Northern Division. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  155. Yanosey, Robert J. (2010). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 8: Allegheny Division, Banks to Antis. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  156. Yanosey, Robert J. (2010). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 9: Allegheny Division, Antis to Derry. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  157. Yanosey, Robert J. (2010). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 10: Pittsburgh Division, Derry to Penn Station. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  158. Yanosey, Robert J. (2011). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 11: Pittsburgh Division - Penn Station to Beaver Falls. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  159. Yanosey, Robert J. (2011). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 12: Lake Division. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  160. Yanosey, Robert J. (2011). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 13: Fort Wayne Division. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  161. Yanosey, Robert J. (2011). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 14: Buckeye Division, East of Columbus Union Depot. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  162. Yanosey, Robert J. (2011). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 15: Buckeye Division, Columbus Union Depot - West. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  163. Yanosey, Robert J. (2011). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 16: Southwestern Division. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  164. Yanosey, Robert J. (2012). Pennsylvania Railroad Facilities in Color, Vol. 17: Chicago Division. . Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    (128 pages, book, Not annotated)
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  165. Yungkurth, Chuck & Miller, Edward Stokes. (1999). Trackside around Scranton, PA, 1952-1976, with Edward S. Miller. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books.
    Robert Yanosey and Morning Sun Books’ Trackside series presents the amazing work of many railroad photographers who worked in many different locations from the 1940s through the mid-1970s.  Volume 14 presents the photographic work of Edward S. Miller covering railroading in the anthracite coal-mining region of the Lackawanna and Wyoming Valleys near Scranton and Wilkes-Barre in northeastern Pennsylvania.  Like the other volumes in the Trackside series this book contains beautiful color photographs of railroad motive power, other equipment, and trackside settings.  Several railroads working in the area are covered in the book, including, Lehigh Valley, Lackawanna, Delaware & Hudson, Erie, Erie Lackawanna, Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley (Laurel Line), Central Railroad of New Jersey (Jersey Central), and the Pennsylvania.  Yungkurth selected many truly stunning photographs depicting railroad activities in this rugged, industrial, yet beautiful area of Pennsylvania.  He provided brief essays on the life and work of Edward S. Miller and railroading in the area.  In addition, he provided an informative introduction to each chapter focusing on the railroad covered in the chapter and informative captions for the photographs.  Yungkurth advised that the PRR’s presence in the area “remains for the most part undocumented,” and unfortunately only four photos of PRR equipment are included.  However, I enjoyed this book very much and recommend it to any railroading enthusiast.  (128 pages, book, obtained from Luzerne County Community College Library in Nanticoke, PA)
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  166. Zak, Martin S. & Withers, Paul K. (1999). Pennsy electric pictorial. Halifax, PA: Withers Publishing.
    Zak and Withers produced a very interesting presentation of black-and-white photographs of Pennsylvania Railroad electric locomotives.  The book consists of five chapters beginning with “Early Pennsy Electrics”, which presents a brief history of the early Pennsy electrics in eight pages and eleven photographs.  The PRR first used electrics to facilitate its 1910 entry into New York City.  Locomotives such as the DD1, the FF1, the L5, the O1 and the O1A,B,&C were used prior to the early 1930s.  The PRR owned 133 of these early electric locomotives, built between August 1905 and May 1934.  All but one D class and one L6A class locomotive were built by the PRR at Juniata.  The second chapter, “P5”, contains thirty-two pages and forty-four photos.  Ninety-two P5 locomotives, built between July 1931 and February 1935 were owned by the PRR.  Only thirteen of these were built by the PRR at Juniata.  Next, “GG1” contains seventy-one pages and eighty-eight photos.  The PRR owned 139 GG1 locomotives, built between August 1934 and June 1943.  All but fifteen were built at Juniata.  The fourth chapter, “E44”, contains twenty-nine pages and thirty-two photos.  Sixty-six E44 & E44As, all built by General Electric between October 1960 and July 1963, were owned by the PRR.  The last chapter devotes thirteen pages and seventeen photos to “Experimental and Secondhand Motors.”  This chapter covers the PRR-built DD2 (one locomotive built in 1938), General Electric’s E2B (six built in 1951), Baldwin’s E3B (two built in 1951), Baldwin’s E2C (two built in 1951), and Alco’s FF2 (seven built from 1927 through 1951, purchased used from Great Northern Railway in the late 1950s and early 1960s).  Each chapter contains a brief introduction and a locomotive roster showing Road Numbers, Class, Wheel Arrangement, Horsepower, Quantity, Builder, Data Built, Electrical Equipment Manufacturer, ac/dc designation, and Notes.  All photographs include informative captions and most were taken by Martin Zak or were from his collection.  A one-page foreword by Frank Tatnall and a five-item bibliography are also included.  (160 pages, book, obtained from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Library)
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  167. Ziel, Ron. (1984). The Pennsy Era on Long Island. Bridgehampton, NY: Sunrise Special Ltd.
    The Pennsylvania Railroad acquired the Long Island Railroad in 1900 because it needed the LIRR's franchise to tunnel under the Hudson and East Rivers to establish a terminal on Manhattan.  The Pennsy maintained ownership of the LIRR until 1966 when it was sold to the State of New York for $65 million, which was only about one-twentieth of its replacement value.  Ziel's book addresses the LI's motive power during a span of 52 years from 1903 to 1955 when the Pennsy-supplied motive power played a major role in the LI.  From 1929 through 1955 Pennsy power dominated the steam roster of the LI, and all the electric locomotives ever owned by the LI were designed and built by the PRR shops in Altoona, Pennsylvania.  This book presents a class-by-class description of the role played by Pennsy locomotives during the period.  Each of eleven chapters deals with a specific locomotive class, for example, H-6sb 2-8-0 Consolidation, E-6s 4-4-2 Atlantics, or K-4s 4-6-2 Pacifics, etc., and presents brief introductory text about the locomotives along with numerous well-captioned photographs.  In addition there are chapters about electric locomotives, internal combustion locomotives, and non-PRR locomotives on the LIRR.  Approximately 215 black-and-white photographs, 21 color photographs, and a 1916 map of the Long Island Railroad System are included.  See also: Kramer (1978).  (116 pages, book)
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  168. Zimmermann, Karl R. (1977). The remarkable GG1. New York: Quadrant Press.
    Zimmermann has published several railroad books and articles, and this is his second book about electric railroading.  The other covered the Milwaukee road.  As a long-time resident of New Jersey he saw many GG1s and his tribute to the beloved locomotive presents a chronicle of its development and use by the Pennsy.  About 120 black-and-white captioned photographs are included along with a few reproductions of PRR promotional materials.  A GG1 roster as of January 1, 1977 which shows the disposition of each locomotive, i.e., whether it was retired or acquired by Conrail, Amtrak, or the New Jersey Department of Transportation, is included.  A brief sixteen-item bibliography is also provided.  (72 pages, book)
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This bibliography was created and is maintained by:
Clark N. Hallman
CNH Bibliographies


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